• How Is The Intestinal Microbiome Altered in Patients With IBD and Does it Change During Therapy?

How Is The Intestinal Microbiome Altered in Patients With IBD and Does it Change During Therapy?

Treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs restores diversity to the intestinal microbiome, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology.  The study associates metabolic interactions among luminal bacteria with outcomes of therapy. Altered interactions between the mucosal immune system and intestinal microbiota contribute to

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  • Does DAA Therapy for HCV Infection Increase Survival in Patients Who Have Responded to Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

Does DAA Therapy for HCV Infection Increase Survival in Patients Who Have Responded to Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

In patients who have received successful treatment for HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), eradication of the HCV infection with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) significantly reduces risk of death, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common cause of HCC in North America and Europe. DAA

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  • Does Placement on a Distant Liver Waitlist Increase Chances of Transplantation?

Does Placement on a Distant Liver Waitlist Increase Chances of Transplantation?

Placement on a liver transplant waitlist outside of a patient’s home region can reduce mortality and increase odds of receiving a liver, researchers report in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Strategies are needed to overcome geographic differences in access to livers for transplantation, which are more likely

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  • How Should We Treat Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis?

How Should We Treat Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis?

Recurrent acute pancreatitis with a clear cause can be treated with endoscopy, explain Liam Zakko and Timothy B. Gardner in a “Here and Now: Clinical Practice” article in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Acute pancreatitis affects 40 to 50 of every 100,000 Americans per year and is the

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  • Review Article: What are Serrated Colorectal Polyps?

Review Article: What are Serrated Colorectal Polyps?

Serrated polyps comprise hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated lesions (SSLs), and traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs). Approximately 25% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from serrated precursor lesions, but there is confusion regarding their terminology, classification, and risk. A review article by Seth D. Crockett and Iris D. Nagtegaal in the October issue of Gastroenterology clarifies

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Herpes Esophagitis Can Resemble Candidiasis

A patient who initially appeared to have Candida esophagitis was later found to have herpes esophagitis, based on findings from endoscopy. Gastroenterologists who observe this type of lesion should consider disorders other than candidiasis. Joyce Chivia and Pedro C. Figueiredo describe a 73-year-old man with bilateral pneumonia and treated with piperacillin and

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  • What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

Use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction) is associated with a 35% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among male patients with benign colorectal neoplasms, researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. The decreased risk of CRC was associated with an increased cumulative dose

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  • What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

In patients who develop dysphagia within a few weeks after fundoplication surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), most symptoms resolve with time and require no intervention. However, patients with clinically significant dysphagia months after this surgery benefit from endoscopic dilation, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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  • How Does Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Affect the Liver?

How Does Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Affect the Liver?

Adults with a severe form of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) caused by the Pi*Z mutation, and mice with the same genetic alteration, can have liver steatosis and impaired lipid secretion, researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. The research team found factors associated with significant liver fibrosis in patients

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  • Efficacy and Safety of Besifovir Dipivoxil Maleate in a Phase 3 Trial of Patients With Chronic HBV Infection

Efficacy and Safety of Besifovir Dipivoxil Maleate in a Phase 3 Trial of Patients With Chronic HBV Infection

The efficacy of 48 weeks treatment with besifovir dipivoxil maleate (BSV) for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is comparable to that of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), with durable effects for 96 weeks, researchers report in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. BSV has a better safety profile

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  • REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) pathogenesis are discussed in a review article by Jianwen Que et al in the August issue of Gastroenterology, including cell transdifferentiation and transcommitment. The authors discuss potential cells of origin for Barrett’s metaplasia, and the possibility that there could be more than 1 type of BE

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  • How Does Gastroparesis Vary Among Different People?

How Does Gastroparesis Vary Among Different People?

Gastroparesis causes, symptoms, and treatments vary among patients of different races, ethnicities, and sexes, researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The prevalence of some gastrointestinal (GI) disorders varies with race and ethnicity. For example, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome are reported less frequently by African Americans.

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  • How Does Gastric Adenocarcinoma Develop?

How Does Gastric Adenocarcinoma Develop?

Overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) in gastric progenitor cells results in inflammation, dysplasia, and tumor formation in mice, researchers report in the July issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to reduce PPARD in gastric progenitor cells might lead to treatments for stomach cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis is associated with chronic inflammation. The

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  • What is the Best Personality for an Endoscopist?

What is the Best Personality for an Endoscopist?

Researchers show that you want your endoscopist to be a type-A person — adenoma detect rates (ADRs) are higher among physicians who describe themselves as more compulsive or thorough, researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. There was no association between ADR and financial incentives, malpractice concerns,

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