Putting a Cap on Acid Reflux

Researchers show that a polysaccharide ‘raft’ can float on top of acid in the stomach to block its backflow into the esophagus. It reduces reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to a clinical trial the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. GERD is a common condition

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Are Mitochondria Involved in Ulcerative Colitis?

Changes in mitochondrial DNA that increase levels of ATP in the intestinal mucosa protect mice from colitis, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to increase mitochondrial ATP production by intestinal epithelial cells might therefore be developed to treat patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Characteristics of UC include reduced levels

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What is the Best Treatment for Esophageal Adenocarcioma?

Patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) who receive endoscopic therapy survive as long as patients treated by surgery, according to the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Esophageal cancer is a highly fatal malignancy—approximate 19% of patients survive 5 years. The incidence of EAC, the most common form of esophageal

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Does Thiopurine Therapy Increase Cancer Risk?

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have a 4-fold increase in risk of lymphoma during treatment with thiopurines, compared to UC patients who have not been treated with these drugs, according to a nationwide cohort study in the November issue of Gastroenterology. The risk increases gradually with successive years of therapy,

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What to do About Gastric Polyps

When clinicians detect a gastric polyp during endoscopy, they are faced with many questions: does the polyp need to be excised, or can a biopsy sample be collected and analyzed? Which polyps should be biopsied? Should patients then be followed, and how? In the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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A New Way to Detect Pancreatic Tumors?

Researchers have developed an ultrasound technique to image pancreatic tumors in mice, described in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This approach might useful in early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). PDAC is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. It is usually diagnosed at an

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  • Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Eight weeks of therapy with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-rich cannabis reduced symptoms in patients with active Crohn’s disease, according to a controlled trial published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, these effects were only temporary. The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries to treat a

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Can a microRNA Control Inflammation in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis?

Loss of a non-coding RNA that regulates inflammation could contribute to development of ulcerative colitis (UC) in children, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. UC and Crohn’s disease are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that affect adults and children. These diseases are complex, and caused by combinations of genetic and

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Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HBV

Pregnant women with Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are less likely to pass the virus on to babies delivered by elective cesarean section, compared to those delivered vaginally or by urgent cesarean section, according to the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Elective cesarean sections for women with pre-delivery

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How Might Carbonation Contribute to Obesity?

Carbonation makes drinks seem less sweet than they really are, and could increase consumption of sugar and food, neuroscientists report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. It might be therefore be best for weight-loss plans to avoid carbonated beverages. Addition of carbon dioxide (CO2) to water (carbonation) makes it effervescent

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