Cancer

Can Imaging Identify the Most Dangerous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms?

Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to identify cystic neoplasms of the pancreas that are most likely to become malignant, according to the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Mucus-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), that have mural nodules

Read more

Could Bone Marrow Cells Contribute to Stomach Cancer?

H pylori recruit bone marrow-derived cells to the gastric mucosa that contribute to tumor development, according to the February issue of Gastroenterology. H pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis through many mechanisms, such as causing inflammation and producing virulence factors that alter gastric cell activity. Over time, these lead to metaplasia, dysplasia,

Read more

Does Celiac Disease Increase the Risk of GI Cancer?

People with celiac disease do not have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, according to a large population-based study from Peter Elfström et al. in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Celiac disease has been associated with GI cancers in small studies, but there have been

Read more

Should Colonoscopies Include Anesthesiologists?

Nearly a quarter of screening colonoscopies performed in the Medicare population involve an anesthesiologist—a percentage that has more than doubled in the past 5 years, according to findings reported in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Many patients do not receive screening colonoscopies because they are concerned about

Read more

New Cell Culture Technology for Colon Cancer and Barrett’s Esophagus

A new method for long-term culture of human primary colonic epithelium provides an important tool for studying colon stem cells, adenocarcinoma, colon cancer, and even Barrett’s esophagus, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. Self-renewal of the small intestinal and colonic epithelium is mediated by proliferation of stem cells and

Read more

Stem Cells Account for Different Fates of Adenomatous and Hyperplastic Polyps

Adenomatous polyps expand the pool of colon stem cells to become malignant, whereas hyperplastic polyps (HPPs) do not, and therefore remain benign, according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology. Many colorectal cancers arise from adenomatous polyps, which contain mutations that inactivate the tumor suppressor APC. These

Read more

Why Do Only Some Gastric Tumors Respond to Therapy?

Tumors from patients with gastric cancer can be divided into subgroups, based on their gene expression pattern. This information can be used to select the best treatment, according to Patrick Tan and colleagues in the August issue of Gastroenterology. Gastric tumors have large, inter-individual differences in aggressiveness, histopathology features, and

Read more

Who Will Develop Colorectal Cancer at a Young Age?

A screen for mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes could be used to identify young people at risk for colorectal cancer, report Paul Limburg et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. It is a challenge to identify people who are less than 50 years old that

Read more

Surviving Childhood Cancer Increases GI Risks

Individuals who received therapy for cancer during childhood have an increased risk of developing GI complications later in life, according to Robert Goldsby et al. in the May issue of Gastroenterology. About 80% of children who receive cancer therapy survive more than 5 years; therapies can be especially toxic to

Read more

H Pylori—Are They Gone Yet?

Helicobacter pylori infection can be treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antibiotics, but physicians need ways to determine if the bacteria are completely eradicated months later. In the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Luigi Gatta et al. describe a simple blood test that can detect H pylori

Read more