Cancer

What Can We Learn from a Pig Model of FAP?

A pig model of intestinal adenoma development, described in the November issue of Gastroenterology, will improve our understanding of colorectal cancer development and could be used to evaluate new therapeutics. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disease; patients develop dysplasias in the colon and rectum that develop to adenomatous

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How Dangerous Are H pylori-Negative Idiopathic Bleeding Ulcers?

Patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer not caused by Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at considerable risk of recurrent bleeding and death. Furthermore, acid-suppressive drugs do not protect these patients, according to the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Peptic ulcers that are not associated

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A Robot to Remove Gastric Neoplasias

Researchers describe a robotic, flexible endoscopy system that can be safely used to remove early-stage stomach tumors in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an effective technique to remove early-stage gastrointestinal tumors. However, it is difficult to master because it requires submucosal dissection

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What are the Barriers to CRC Screening?

Waiving copayments for colonoscopy examinations to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) increases the number of patients that undergo screening, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Colonoscopy is a recommended, cost-effective method of CRC screening that appears to reduce mortality, yet only half of

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How Does Aspirin Prevent Cancer?

Aspirin blocks proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and causes them to self destruct by inhibiting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), according to the June issue of Gastroenterology. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been shown in many studies to reduce risk of cancer—particularly of CRC—by unknown mechanisms.

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A Special Issue on Viral Hepatitis

The May issue of Gastroenterology features a very special supplement—“Viral Hepatitis: A Changing Field”—comprising 17 review and commentary articles from international leaders in hepatitis treatment and research. The issue provides insight into the rapid progress made in the treatment and management of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as our

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Abdominal CT Radiation Risk

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal disorders can be exposed to high levels of radiation—mostly from abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans—reports the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Access to high-quality facilities and technologic advances have increased the use of CT imaging of the GI tract.

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Can Imaging Identify the Most Dangerous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms?

Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to identify cystic neoplasms of the pancreas that are most likely to become malignant, according to the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Mucus-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), that have mural nodules

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Could Bone Marrow Cells Contribute to Stomach Cancer?

H pylori recruit bone marrow-derived cells to the gastric mucosa that contribute to tumor development, according to the February issue of Gastroenterology. H pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis through many mechanisms, such as causing inflammation and producing virulence factors that alter gastric cell activity. Over time, these lead to metaplasia, dysplasia,

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Does Celiac Disease Increase the Risk of GI Cancer?

People with celiac disease do not have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, according to a large population-based study from Peter Elfström et al. in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Celiac disease has been associated with GI cancers in small studies, but there have been

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