GI Tract
  • Review Article: What are Serrated Colorectal Polyps?

Review Article: What are Serrated Colorectal Polyps?

Serrated polyps comprise hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated lesions (SSLs), and traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs). Approximately 25% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) arise from serrated precursor lesions, but there is confusion regarding their terminology, classification, and risk. A review article by Seth D. Crockett and Iris D. Nagtegaal in the October issue of Gastroenterology clarifies

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Herpes Esophagitis Can Resemble Candidiasis

A patient who initially appeared to have Candida esophagitis was later found to have herpes esophagitis, based on findings from endoscopy. Gastroenterologists who observe this type of lesion should consider disorders other than candidiasis. Joyce Chivia and Pedro C. Figueiredo describe a 73-year-old man with bilateral pneumonia and treated with piperacillin and

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  • What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

Use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction) is associated with a 35% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among male patients with benign colorectal neoplasms, researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. The decreased risk of CRC was associated with an increased cumulative dose

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  • What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

In patients who develop dysphagia within a few weeks after fundoplication surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), most symptoms resolve with time and require no intervention. However, patients with clinically significant dysphagia months after this surgery benefit from endoscopic dilation, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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  • REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) pathogenesis are discussed in a review article by Jianwen Que et al in the August issue of Gastroenterology, including cell transdifferentiation and transcommitment. The authors discuss potential cells of origin for Barrett’s metaplasia, and the possibility that there could be more than 1 type of BE

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  • How Does Gastroparesis Vary Among Different People?

How Does Gastroparesis Vary Among Different People?

Gastroparesis causes, symptoms, and treatments vary among patients of different races, ethnicities, and sexes, researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The prevalence of some gastrointestinal (GI) disorders varies with race and ethnicity. For example, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome are reported less frequently by African Americans.

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  • How Does Gastric Adenocarcinoma Develop?

How Does Gastric Adenocarcinoma Develop?

Overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) in gastric progenitor cells results in inflammation, dysplasia, and tumor formation in mice, researchers report in the July issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to reduce PPARD in gastric progenitor cells might lead to treatments for stomach cancer. Gastric carcinogenesis is associated with chronic inflammation. The

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  • What is the Best Personality for an Endoscopist?

What is the Best Personality for an Endoscopist?

Researchers show that you want your endoscopist to be a type-A person — adenoma detect rates (ADRs) are higher among physicians who describe themselves as more compulsive or thorough, researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. There was no association between ADR and financial incentives, malpractice concerns,

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  • Can Altering the Intestinal Microbiome Reduce Wheat Sensitivity?

Can Altering the Intestinal Microbiome Reduce Wheat Sensitivity?

Amylase trypsin inhibitors (ATIs), which are enzymes in wheat, promote intestinal dysfunction and exacerbate inflammation in response to gluten, researchers show in study of mice published in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to alter the intestinal microbiome, such as administration of bacteria with ATI-degrading capacity, might be effective for

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  • A Case of Spirochetosis That Resembles IBD

A Case of Spirochetosis That Resembles IBD

Researchers describe a patient with intestinal spirochetosis—a rare intestinal infection caused by Brachyspira aalborgi or Brachyspira pilosicoli that can involve the colon or terminal ileum and mimic inflammatory bowel diseases—in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Manasi Agrawal et al report the case of a 45-year-old man with HIV infection and an undetectable viral

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