GI Tract

Skin Problems from IBD Therapy?

Recurring and intense skin lesions cause one-third of patients that take anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to discontinue treatment, reports Jean–François Rahier et al. in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Anti-TNF agents are used to treat patients with a variety of immune

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Eating Away at Crohn’s Disease

Genetic features of many patients with Crohn’s disease affect the ability of their intestinal cells to undergo autophagy—a form of self-digestion that allows them to fight pathogenic bacteria, according to a study by Craig Homer et al. in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Crohn’s disease is believed to be caused

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You Swallowed What?

Hospitals can spend millions of dollars removing foreign objects—pens, batteries, and even razor blades—intentionally swallowed by patients, according to the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. These cases are unusual but costly for the hospitals that deal with them. Brian Huang et al. found that at Rhode Island Hospital,

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Relief from Gastroparesis?

Gastric electrical stimulation (GES) reduces nausea and vomiting and improves quality of life in diabetic patients with gastroparesis, according to Richard W. McCallum et al. in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. McCallum et al. studied 55 diabetic patients with gastroparesis (delayed gastric emptying, which leads to vomiting,

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In CRC Screening, Location Matters

Colonoscopy screening reduces mortality from cancers of the distal, but not proximal, colon, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Harminder Singh et al. studied mortality from CRC among more than 55,000 people that had received screening colonoscopies, compared with the general population. They found that

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Who Has the Greatest Risk for Colorectal Cancer?

Men and smokers have the greatest risk for developing colorectal neoplasms—even more than people with a family history of this cancer—according to Michael Hoffmeister et al. in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Current guidelines recommend that individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer (CRC), inflammatory bowel

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IBD Risk Beyond the Bowel

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a recurring problem for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a clinical study by Gottfried Novacek et al. in this month’s issue of Gastroenterology. People with IBD have a high risk for developing blood clots, but it is not clear if they should receive

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Reflux and Laryngitis—a Complicated Relationship

Results from a large clinical trial show that proton pump inhibitors relieve some, but not all the symptoms of chronic laryngitis. One type of laryngitis, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), is characterized by hoarseness, chronic cough, frequent throat clearing, and the feeling of something in the throat. Because it is believed to

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New Word on GERD?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are useful for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although heartburn completely resolves in only 40% of patients that take these drugs. Furthermore, long-term use of PPIs can increase risk for pneumonia, Clostridium difficile infection, and bone disorders, so other therapeutic strategies are needed. In the August

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Curbing Crohn’s for the Long Term?

Most people with Crohn’s disease receive surgery, yet the disease comes back a short time later. A study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology reports that giving patients low doses of infliximab immediately after surgery prevents disease recurrence over long time periods. Dario Sorrentino et al. began

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