GI Tract
  • What Are the Best Endpoints for Trials of Agents for Ulcerative Colitis?

What Are the Best Endpoints for Trials of Agents for Ulcerative Colitis?

Despite advances in methods of clinical trials for ulcerative colitis (UC), there is still a large amount of variation in endpoints, even in definitions of response and remission, reseachers found in a systematic review published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The authors conclude that we need a

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A Parasitic Infection From Sashimi

Researchers report a case of anisakiasis, caused by nematodes of the genus Anisakis—a parasite transmitted to humans through raw seafood such as sushi and sashimi. In the May issue of Gastroenterology, Kaori Ikegami et al describe the case of a 47-year-old man who arrived at the emergency department with severe epigastric pain.

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  • What is the Best Way to Assess Treatment Response in Patients With Achalasia?

What is the Best Way to Assess Treatment Response in Patients With Achalasia?

A more accurate method to evaluate outcomes of treatment for achalasia is described in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The method identifies patients with good outcomes with higher levels of sensitivity (same specificity) than timed-barium esophagrams or impedance-manometry bolus transit assessments alone. Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder

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  • Does Drinking Coffee Increase Survival of Patients With Colorectal Cancer?

Does Drinking Coffee Increase Survival of Patients With Colorectal Cancer?

Drinking 2 or more cups of coffee per day after a diagnosis of stage I to III colorectal cancer (CRC) reduces risk of CRC-specific and all-cause mortality, researchers report in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Patients who maintain a high level of coffee consumption before and after diagnosis have even better odds for survival.

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  • Surgical vs Endoscopic Treatment of T1 Esophageal Adenocarcinoma?

Surgical vs Endoscopic Treatment of T1 Esophageal Adenocarcinoma?

Endoscopic therapy of T1a esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) yields more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and is more cost effective than esophagectomy, shows a Markov model analysis published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, therapy for T1b EAC should be selected based on patients’ age and comorbidities. Although EAC has

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  • What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

When patients with Crohn’s disease in sustained remission stopped taking infliximab for a median 7 years, almost one fifth did not require retreatment or have a major complication, researchers report in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Fewer than one fifth of patients required surgery or developed a complex perianal fistula. Increasing numbers of patients

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  • Model: Microfabricated Crypt Scaffolds for Studying Human Colon Stem Cells

Model: Microfabricated Crypt Scaffolds for Studying Human Colon Stem Cells

Researchers created an in vitro human colon crypt array that provides an accurate representation of human intestinal crypts, reported in the February issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. This system re-creates an intestinal epithelium with a high density of polarized crypts that respond in a physiologic manner to growth factors, metabolites, or

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  • Are Patients With PSC and Colitis More likely to Have Subclinical Inflammation?

Are Patients With PSC and Colitis More likely to Have Subclinical Inflammation?

Patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and ulcerative colitis (UC) in remission are significantly more likely to have inflammation of the right colon, based on endoscopic and histologic markers, than patients with UC without PSC, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. These findings provide insight into cause

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Video: Prick Test to Identify Allergens That Cause Esophageal Sensitization

An esophageal prick test, in which allergens are injected directly into the esophageal mucosa, appears to identify individuals with esophageal sensitization, researchers report in the January issue of Gastroenterology. In patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), food allergens are believed to induce an inflammatory response that can make swallowing and eating a challenge. Identifying and

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  • What Happens in the Intestine in Patients With Wilson Disease?

What Happens in the Intestine in Patients With Wilson Disease?

ATP7B regulates vesicular storage of copper and buffers its levels in enterocytes to maintain a range necessary for formation of lipid-transporting vesicles, researchers report in the January issue of Gastroenterology. The authors show that a misbalance of copper and lipid in the intestine could account for gastrointestinal manifestations of Wilson

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