Technology

Does Vitamin D Prevent Crohn’s Disease?

Women with higher intake of vitamin D are less likely to develop Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, according to a study published in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Vitamin D deficiency has been described in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and administration of vitamin D to mice with colitis

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Abdominal CT Radiation Risk

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal disorders can be exposed to high levels of radiation—mostly from abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans—reports the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Access to high-quality facilities and technologic advances have increased the use of CT imaging of the GI tract.

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Is it Safe to Donate Part of Your Liver?

Donating part of your liver is just as safe as donating a kidney—donors of these organs have survival rates similar to the rest of the population, according to an article in the February issue of Gastroenterology. With organ shortages, live-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a lifesaving alternative to transplantation from deceased

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Can Imaging Identify the Most Dangerous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms?

Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to identify cystic neoplasms of the pancreas that are most likely to become malignant, according to the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Mucus-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), that have mural nodules

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Could Bone Marrow Cells Contribute to Stomach Cancer?

H pylori recruit bone marrow-derived cells to the gastric mucosa that contribute to tumor development, according to the February issue of Gastroenterology. H pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis through many mechanisms, such as causing inflammation and producing virulence factors that alter gastric cell activity. Over time, these lead to metaplasia, dysplasia,

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Achalasia, Pneumatic Dilation, Risks, and Repairs

Pneumatic dilation as a treatment for achalasia is more likely to cause esophageal perforations in the elderly, but these tears can be successfully treated medically, rather than surgically, according to the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Achalasia is a rare motor disorder of the esophagus, cause by defects

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How Do Lipids Affect Liver Disease?

Changes in lipid intake or metabolism can affect development of liver injury and fibrosis, according to two studies in mice published in the January issue of Gastroenterology. The liver is an important site of energy production and lipid metabolism. However, accumulation of excess fat in the liver promotes development of fibrosis, cirrhosis

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Can Patients With Crohn’s Disease Ever Stop Taking Infliximab?

Half of patients with Crohn’s disease treated with infliximab experience a relapse within the first year after they stop taking the drug, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology. Drugs such as infliximab inhibit the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and are effective in reducing

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Should Colonoscopies Include Anesthesiologists?

Nearly a quarter of screening colonoscopies performed in the Medicare population involve an anesthesiologist—a percentage that has more than doubled in the past 5 years, according to findings reported in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Many patients do not receive screening colonoscopies because they are concerned about

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Opioids for Chronic Abdominal Pain?

The number of prescriptions of opioids written for patients with chronic abdominal pain has more than doubled in the past decade, according to a study published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Chronic abdominal pain is common, yet a challenge to treat, so clinicians have increasingly prescribed

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