Technology

Same Liver, New Location

Functional liver tissue can be grown in lymph nodes of mice and rescue them from lethal hepatic disease, reports Toshitaka Hoppo et al. in the February issue of Gastroenterology—lymph nodes therefore might someday be used as sites for hepatocyte transplantation in patients with end-stage liver disease. Many patients with chronic hepatic

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What is the Best Strategy for Treating Pediatric Autoimmune Hepatitis?

Immunosuppressant therapy causes permanent recovery from liver failure in most children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), reports Miriam Cuarterolo et al. in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. AIH is a progressive, inflammatory liver disease that predominantly affects girls before puberty. Without treatment, it progresses to cirrhosis and liver

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IBD Guardian

Researchers have identified a molecule that protects colon cells from injury in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The study, published by Beth McConnell et al. in the February issue of Gastroenterology, reports that Klf5 controls genes that mediate recovery from colonic injury. Klf5 regulates transcription of genes

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Are Biopsies Safe for Patients with Advanced Liver Disease?

Liver biopsies are relatively safe and well tolerated among patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C, based on data from the HALT-C trial.  Liver biopsy analysis provides information for diagnosis and planning of treatment strategies for patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis C infection. However, biopsies

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Cadaveric Liver Cells for Transplantation?

The only effective treatment for liver failure is transplantation, which is limited by the short supply of organ donors. A study by Laura Erker et al. in the September issue of Gastroenterology reports that liver cells from human cadavers might someday be used for transplantation. Erker et al. showed that

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Marking the Course of Hepatitis B

It is a challenge to monitor the course of chronic hepatitis B. Patients still carry the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) but have varying levels of viral DNA, HBeAg, and liver inflammation—and remain at risk for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two papers in this month’s issue of Gastroenterology investigate Hepatitis

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New Word on GERD?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are useful for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although heartburn completely resolves in only 40% of patients that take these drugs. Furthermore, long-term use of PPIs can increase risk for pneumonia, Clostridium difficile infection, and bone disorders, so other therapeutic strategies are needed. In the August

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Which Roads Lead to NASH?

Which Roads Lead to NASH? The progressive liver disease nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is mediated by an innate immune response in the liver that causes tissue damage and fibrosis. The innate immune system protects against invading pathogens, but it’s not clear how it becomes activated in livers of patients with NASH.

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Does Polyp Size Matter?

Computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a useful tool for colon cancer screening. The challenge, however, is determining which lesions are most dangerous—should some be treated aggressively and others just monitored or ignored? Does size matter? In the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Perry Pickhardt et al. assessed the

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Welcome to The AGA Journals Blog

Welcome to “The AGA Journals Blog”—a forum for discussion of the latest discoveries in the fields of gastroenterology and hepatology. Each week we will comment on a new article from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) journals Gastroenterology and Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CGH). The goals for the blog are two-fold:

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