Treatment for Gallstones?

Cholesterol gallstone disease might be treated with activators of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) such as St. John’s Wort, according to a study in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Cholesterol gallstone disease is caused by a biochemical imbalance of lipids and bile salts in the gallbladder bile. Jinhan He et

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Does Mucosal Healing Determine Which Patients Will Recover From Ulcerative Colitis?

Lack of mucosal healing, based on endoscopic analysis, identifies patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who are not likely to respond to corticosteroid therapy, according to Sandro Ardizzone et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a prospective study, Ardizzone et al. followed 157 patients with moderate

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Coffee Therapy for Hepatitis C?

Drinking 3 cups of coffee a day helps patients with hepatitis C respond to treatment, report Neal Freedman et al. in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Coffee reduces risks of progression of liver diseases and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, so Freedman et al. investigated whether it also had benefits for patients

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Who Will Develop Colorectal Cancer at a Young Age?

A screen for mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes could be used to identify young people at risk for colorectal cancer, report Paul Limburg et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. It is a challenge to identify people who are less than 50 years old that

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Tracking Crohn’s Therapy

Measuring blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, is a good way to monitor recovery from Crohn’s disease (CD) in patients being treated with infliximab, according to Matthias Jürgens et al. in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. CRP is a protein released into the blood

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Surviving Childhood Cancer Increases GI Risks

Individuals who received therapy for cancer during childhood have an increased risk of developing GI complications later in life, according to Robert Goldsby et al. in the May issue of Gastroenterology. About 80% of children who receive cancer therapy survive more than 5 years; therapies can be especially toxic to

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H Pylori—Are They Gone Yet?

Helicobacter pylori infection can be treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antibiotics, but physicians need ways to determine if the bacteria are completely eradicated months later. In the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Luigi Gatta et al. describe a simple blood test that can detect H pylori

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Colon Complications from Anti-Inflammatory Drugs?

Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause stomach problems, but a large prospective study by Lisa Strate et al. in the May issue of Gastroenterology shows that they can also damage the colon, causing diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Strate et al. tracked the use of aspirin,

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What is the Best Strategy for Children with Celiac Disease?

Most children with potential celiac disease, based on serologic markers, remain healthy after 3 years—only about a third develop villous atrophy, report Antonella Tosco et al. in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, antibody tests can identify children at greatest risk for the changes in the intestinal

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Origins of Gastric Cancer

Gastric tumors can arise from a single mutation in a single stomach gland, according to Lydia Gutierrez-Gonzalez et al. in the April issue of Gastroenterology. To study how gastric dysplasias form and expand, Gutierrez-Gonzalez et al. analyzed 23 samples of gastric epithelium from patients who received surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma

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Cleaning for Colonoscopy

GoLytely better prepares the colon for screening colonoscopy than MiraLAX, report Michael Hjelkrem et al. in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Efficient cleansing of the colon is one of the most important factors for successful colonscopy examination, but also a major reason that patients avoid screening—because of

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As Incidence of HCV Infection Increases, a New Mouse Model to Study

The incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and its complications—hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis—are increasing, according to Fasiha Kanwal et al. Fortunately, a new mouse model has been created to study disease progression and treatment, as described by Michael Washburn et al. These findings were reported in separate articles

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Advance Against Hepatitis B

Long-term treatment with entecavir, an inhibitor of hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, reduces cirrhosis and fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection, report Eugene Schiff et al. in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.  Patients with chronic hepatitis B can develop liver fibrosis or cirrhosis and have

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Tracking Pancreatic Cancer Cells

Tumors spread to other parts of the body when cancer cells can escape into the bloodstream, although it is not exactly clear how they enter the circulation or decide where to form new tumors. Andrew Rhim and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a technology to label tumor

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