• LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

Patients receiving laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) had significantly greater long-term reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure than patients given esomeprazole, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, both treatments controlled symptoms in most patients, and esophageal and gastric pH were not

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  • Do Proton Pump Inhibitors Reduce the Need for Phlebotomy in Patients With Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

Do Proton Pump Inhibitors Reduce the Need for Phlebotomy in Patients With Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

In certain patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for 2 or more years significantly reduced the number of phlebotomies required to maintain serum levels below 100 μg/L, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. HH is one of the most common

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Does a Response to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Indicate GERD?

Just because a patient’s upper gastrointestinal symptoms are alleviated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) doesn’t necessarily mean that they have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The efficacy of PPI therapy often is tested to determine whether patients’ symptoms are acid-related and

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Many Patients Without GERD Continue to Take PPIs

More than 42% of patients with negative results from pH monitoring studies continue proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, despite evidence that they do not have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. PPI therapy is effective for about 75% of patients with GERD

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