• What is the Best Treatment Option for Fistulizing Crohn’s Disease?

What is the Best Treatment Option for Fistulizing Crohn’s Disease?

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists are effective for induction and maintenance of perianal fistula response and remission in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD), a systematic review and meta-analysis shows in the December issue of Clinical Gastoenterology and Hepatology. However, there are few data on the effects on internal fistulae, and further studies

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  • Is it Safe or Effective to Combine Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

Is it Safe or Effective to Combine Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

Little is known about the efficacy and safety of combination targeted therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), despite their use in treatment of other immune-mediated disorders. In a review article in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Robert P. Hirten et al discuss findings from studies of biologic

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  • What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

When patients with Crohn’s disease in sustained remission stopped taking infliximab for a median 7 years, almost one fifth did not require retreatment or have a major complication, researchers report in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Fewer than one fifth of patients required surgery or developed a complex perianal fistula. Increasing numbers of patients

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  • Does Immunomodulator Therapy for IBD During Pregnancy Affect Newborn Response to Vaccines?

Does Immunomodulator Therapy for IBD During Pregnancy Affect Newborn Response to Vaccines?

Rates of adequate serologic response to Haemophilus influenzae B (HiB) and tetanus vaccines are similar among infants born to women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) treated with immunomodulator or biologic agents compared to women who did not receive these immunosuppressive drugs during pregnancy, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology

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Does IBD Increase Risk for Oral Cancer?

Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have an increased risk of oral cancers—especially tongue cancer—researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Women are at higher risk than men. Oral cancers develop in the mucosal surfaces of the lips, floor of mouth, tongue, buccal mucosa, lower and

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Should Patients with Crohn’s Disease Continue Receiving Immunomodulators When Starting Anti-TNF Therapy?

Continued use of immunomodulator therapy in patients with Crohn’s disease receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is no more effective than anti-TNF monotherapy in inducing or maintaining response or remission, researchers show. The meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials is published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. There is debate

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  • This is Your Brain on Anti-TNF Therapy

This is Your Brain on Anti-TNF Therapy

Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents rapidly reduce pain perception in brains of patients with Crohn’s disease, researchers show in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This observation could explain how clinical disease activity is often reduced long before signs of mucosal healing. Patients with Crohn’s disease treated with anti-TNF agents often report reductions in abdominal pain

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Podcast: Efficacy of Vedolizumab in Patients with Moderately to Severely Active Crohn’s disease

Listen to Bruce Sands discuss his article in the September issue of Gastroenterology discussing results from placebo-controlled, phase 3 double-blind trial of the efficacy of vedolizumab  in patients with moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease, including those for whom previous anti-TNF treatment had failed. Sands et al. report that vedolizumab, an antibody against the integrin α4β7, is no more effective

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In Treating Crohn’s Disease, Earlier is Better

Patients receiving medical therapies when they have more complicated stages of Crohn’s disease (CD) are more likely to require surgery, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The disease is most-effectively treated by drugs at its early, inflammatory stages. Patients have a 40%–71% risk for requiring

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