• Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms, although uncommon, are an important cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of all ages, researchers remind readers in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Puneet Chhabra and Deepak K. Bhasin describe the case of a 72-year-old man with Parkinson disease who presented with fatigue, dyspnea on exertion, and

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Gastrointestinal Bleeding Caused by Gastric Tuberculosis

Researchers describe a case of gastric tuberculosis that led to GI bleeding in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Vishal Sharma et al report that a 30-year-old man who was a resident of North India presented to emergency services with 2 episodes of painless hematemesis. He did not have a history of

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  • Hemosuccus Pancreaticus Caused by a Pancreatic Tumor

Hemosuccus Pancreaticus Caused by a Pancreatic Tumor

Researchers describe a rare cause of hemosuccus pancreaticus in a patient with pancreatic cancer. The gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by erosion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma into the colon, they show in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is defined as hemorrhage from the ampulla of Vater via the pancreatic

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  • Video Abstract: Pros and Cons of Continued Aspirin Use in Patients with Lower GI Bleeding

Video Abstract: Pros and Cons of Continued Aspirin Use in Patients with Lower GI Bleeding

In aspirin users with a history of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, continued aspirin use increases risk of recurrent bleeding by almost 3-fold, but reduces risk of serious cardiovascular events by 40% and risk of death from other causes by 17%, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology. First author Francis K.L. Chan discusses the group’s

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  • Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Nonselective beta blockers (NSBBs) do not significantly increase the risk of death in patients with cirrhosis and ascites or refractory ascites, researchers report in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the position that NSBBs be routinely withheld from patients with

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  • 5 Hospitalized and 1 Dead in Clinical Trial in France

5 Hospitalized and 1 Dead in Clinical Trial in France

Five men were hospitalized and 1 died after a drug trial in France, the country’s health minister announced on January 15. Marisol Touraine, the minister for social affairs, health, and women’s rights, said in a statement that her office was informed the evening of January 14 about a “serious accident”

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VIDEO: Endoscopic Suturing for Ulcer Exclusion

Researchers report the use of endoscopic surgical suturing for ulcer exclusion in the July issue of Gastroenterology, and provide a video of their procedure. It is important to prevent rebleeding of peptic ulcers. A prototype endoscopic suturing device has been developed to provide hemostasis in patients with massively bleeding gastric ulcers. Philip Wai Yan Chiu et

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Video: Does Stress Cause Ulcers?

Psychological stress increases the risk for peptic ulcers, partly by affecting health risk behaviors, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Although peptic ulcers are considered to be caused by stress, Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) took over as the accepted causes. However, less than a third of peptic ulcers develop in people

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  • Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Mesalamine is no better than placebo in preventing recurrent diverticulitis, and is not recommended for its treatment, researchers conclude from 2 international phase 3 studies. The findings are published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Diverticular disease is characterized by formation of small pouches (diverticula) that push outward through weak spots in the colon wall.  Diverticulitis

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Do Continuous-flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices Increase Risk of GI Bleeding and Thrombosis?

Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices increase the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and thromboembolic events, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation results in improved survival and quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure. Continuous-flow LVADs (CF-LVADs) are

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