• Does an SVR to Therapy for HCV-associated Cirrhosis Reduce Portal Pressure?

Does an SVR to Therapy for HCV-associated Cirrhosis Reduce Portal Pressure?

A sustained virologic response (SVR) to all-oral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis significantly reduces the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Nevertheless, almost 80% of patients maintain significant portal hypertension and have a continued risk of decompensation. In patients with compensated

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  • Who Should Undergo Surgery for Pancreatic Cysts?

Who Should Undergo Surgery for Pancreatic Cysts?

When should a patient with a pancreatic cystic lesion undergo surgery? How can we tell if the surgery will provide relief, or prevent death from pancreatic cancer, or burden a patient with an unnecessary procedure? Two articles in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology increase our understanding of

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Does Thiopurine Therapy for IBD Increase Risk of Acute Myeloid Leukemias and Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

Past exposure to thiopurines increases the risk of myeloid disorders 7-fold among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), according to a prospective study in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Physicians should consider this finding when placing patients on thiopurine therapy, to best calculate risks and benefits. Despite

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Does Thiopurine Therapy Increase Cancer Risk?

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have a 4-fold increase in risk of lymphoma during treatment with thiopurines, compared to UC patients who have not been treated with these drugs, according to a nationwide cohort study in the November issue of Gastroenterology. The risk increases gradually with successive years of therapy,

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  • Overall Diet, Rather than Specific Foods, Affect Risk for Esophageal Cancer

Overall Diet, Rather than Specific Foods, Affect Risk for Esophageal Cancer

A Mediterranean diet and overall healthy eating, rather than a particular group of foods or nutrients, reduce the risk for esophageal cancers—particularly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), according to the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Although diet has been associated with cancers of the esophagus and stomach, few prospective

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How Does Aspirin Prevent Cancer?

Aspirin blocks proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and causes them to self destruct by inhibiting the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), according to the June issue of Gastroenterology. Aspirin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been shown in many studies to reduce risk of cancer—particularly of CRC—by unknown mechanisms.

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Abdominal CT Radiation Risk

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other gastrointestinal disorders can be exposed to high levels of radiation—mostly from abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans—reports the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Access to high-quality facilities and technologic advances have increased the use of CT imaging of the GI tract.

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Does Celiac Disease Increase the Risk of GI Cancer?

People with celiac disease do not have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, according to a large population-based study from Peter Elfström et al. in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Celiac disease has been associated with GI cancers in small studies, but there have been

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Who Will Develop Colorectal Cancer at a Young Age?

A screen for mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes could be used to identify young people at risk for colorectal cancer, report Paul Limburg et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. It is a challenge to identify people who are less than 50 years old that

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