• Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

The intestinal microbiota of many healthy, first-degree relatives of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is dysbiotic, signifying a pre-disease state, low-level inflammation, and susceptibility to IBD, researchers report in the November issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Changes in the intestinal microbiome are involved in the pathogenesis

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  • Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Dysbiosis contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by altering colonic expression of genes that regulate inflammation and the immune response, researchers report in the July issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been associated with IBD. However, it is not

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  • A Non-Antibiotic Against Clostridium difficile Infection

A Non-Antibiotic Against Clostridium difficile Infection

A non-antibiotic drug reduces the effects Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) by disabling the bacteria’s toxins, a study showed in mice. The orally administered agent, ebselen, has been in clinical trials for an unrelated condition and could offer a new approach for combating multidrug-resistant CDI. C difficile infection causes life-threatening diarrhea and

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  • Is FMT Ready for IBD?

Is FMT Ready for IBD?

Despite promising findings from 2 studies of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in patients with ulcerative colitis, the technology should remain in clinical trials and is not ready for routine practice in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), write Ari M. Grinspan and Colleen R. Kelly in an editorial. The success of FMT

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  • VEGF Signaling Prevents Senescence in Colorectal Tumors

VEGF Signaling Prevents Senescence in Colorectal Tumors

Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) signaling prevents senescence of colorectal cancer cells by inactivating p21, researchers report in the July issue of Gastroenterology. Inactivation of this pathway correlates with survival of patients treated with anti-VEGF cancer drug bevacizumab. VEGF, a growth factor that has been well studied for its

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  • Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

People of Indian origin living in the United States have a greater than average risk for all types of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) than other American populations, researchers report in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. East Asians and Hispanics have a lower risk, similar to that of the populations still

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  • Food Emulsifiers Increase Intestinal Permeability to Promote Inflammation

Food Emulsifiers Increase Intestinal Permeability to Promote Inflammation

Food additives commonly used to thicken and stabilize processed foods disrupt the intestinal microbiota to cause inflammation, researchers found in a study of mice. Emulsifiers are added to foods to hold together mixtures of fat and water, which would otherwise separate. Healthy mice fed a diet containing commonly used emulsifiers (1%

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  • Does Coffee Affect Development of Cholestatic Liver Disorders?

Does Coffee Affect Development of Cholestatic Liver Disorders?

Lower levels of coffee consumption are associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), but not primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Coffee is considered to be a medically beneficial beverage—consumption has been associated with reductions in metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and weight

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Does Thiopurine Therapy Increase Cancer Risk?

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have a 4-fold increase in risk of lymphoma during treatment with thiopurines, compared to UC patients who have not been treated with these drugs, according to a nationwide cohort study in the November issue of Gastroenterology. The risk increases gradually with successive years of therapy,

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Does Depression Increase the Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

Depression increases the risk for Crohn’s disease in women, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Psychological factors might therefore contribute to development of this disorder. Anxiety, depression, and other psychological disorders are common in people with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis

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