Does Depression Increase the Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

Depression increases the risk for Crohn’s disease in women, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Psychological factors might therefore contribute to development of this disorder. Anxiety, depression, and other psychological disorders are common in people with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis

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Causes and Treatment of Very-Early Onset IBD

Many infants with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have genetic defects that disrupt IL-10 signaling, according to the August issue of Gastroenterology. However, these children can be successfully treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, researchers report. IBD develops mostly in adolescents and young adults, but can occur in very young

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Who Will Develop Pouchitis After Ileal Pouch–Anal Anastomosis?

Serum markers can be used to identify patients with ulcerative colitis most likely to have inflammatory complications after ileal pouch–anal anastomosis (IPAA), according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. More than 20% of individuals with ulcerative colitis eventually need surgery for this disease. Patients with fulminant or

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Does Vitamin D Prevent Crohn’s Disease?

Women with higher intake of vitamin D are less likely to develop Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, according to a study published in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Vitamin D deficiency has been described in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and administration of vitamin D to mice with colitis

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Certolizumab and Remission in Some Patients With Crohn’s Disease

The drug certolizumab pegol induces remission in patients with Crohn’s disease who have high baseline levels of inflammation, according to William Sandborn et al. in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that do not respond conventional therapy are often treated with

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Tracking Crohn’s Therapy

Measuring blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, is a good way to monitor recovery from Crohn’s disease (CD) in patients being treated with infliximab, according to Matthias Jürgens et al. in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. CRP is a protein released into the blood

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