What Can We Learn from a Pig Model of FAP?

A pig model of intestinal adenoma development, described in the November issue of Gastroenterology, will improve our understanding of colorectal cancer development and could be used to evaluate new therapeutics. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disease; patients develop dysplasias in the colon and rectum that develop to adenomatous

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New Cell Culture Technology for Colon Cancer and Barrett’s Esophagus

A new method for long-term culture of human primary colonic epithelium provides an important tool for studying colon stem cells, adenocarcinoma, colon cancer, and even Barrett’s esophagus, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. Self-renewal of the small intestinal and colonic epithelium is mediated by proliferation of stem cells and

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Stem Cells Account for Different Fates of Adenomatous and Hyperplastic Polyps

Adenomatous polyps expand the pool of colon stem cells to become malignant, whereas hyperplastic polyps (HPPs) do not, and therefore remain benign, according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology. Many colorectal cancers arise from adenomatous polyps, which contain mutations that inactivate the tumor suppressor APC. These

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Who Will Develop Colorectal Cancer at a Young Age?

A screen for mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes could be used to identify young people at risk for colorectal cancer, report Paul Limburg et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. It is a challenge to identify people who are less than 50 years old that

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Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Prevent Colorectal Cancer (for Some)

Aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) in some people but not others, according to the March issue of Gastroenterology. Andrew Chan et al. found that these drugs reduce the risk of CRC only in women with high levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR-2), a

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