• Microbes go With the Flow (of Oxygen) in the Intestine

Microbes go With the Flow (of Oxygen) in the Intestine

The intestine contains a radial gradient of microbes that changes with the distribution of oxygen and nutrients, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Further study of this distribution could provide information about activities of the microbiota in the healthy and inflamed intestine. The bacteria of the intestinal live in

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  • Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Mesalamine is no better than placebo in preventing recurrent diverticulitis, and is not recommended for its treatment, researchers conclude from 2 international phase 3 studies. The findings are published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Diverticular disease is characterized by formation of small pouches (diverticula) that push outward through weak spots in the colon wall.  Diverticulitis

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Video: What is Causing the Serpentine Movement in this Man’s Abdomen?

In the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, physicians present a video of small bowel peristaltic movements visible from the outside of a patient with sigmoid volvulus. In their report, Foke van Delft and Elske Hoornenborg describe a 72-year-old Surinamese Hindustani man with diabetes, progressive abdominal pain, vomiting, shortness of

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Can a microRNA Control Inflammation in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis?

Loss of a non-coding RNA that regulates inflammation could contribute to development of ulcerative colitis (UC) in children, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. UC and Crohn’s disease are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that affect adults and children. These diseases are complex, and caused by combinations of genetic and

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How Can the Gut Microbiota Contribute to Liver Disease?

Microbes that reside in colons of obese individuals produce many compounds that could contribute to development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other complications of obesity, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Microorganisms living in the human intestine (gut microbiota) affect

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Is Medicine or Surgery the Best Treatment for Crohn’s Disease?

For patients with Crohn’s disease and intra-abdominal abscesses, nonsurgical and surgical management strategies result in similar rates of abscess recurrence and complications, according to the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Crohn’s disease can progress from inflammation and ulceration to bowel damage that includes formation of abscesses, phlegmon, and

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High Rate of Complications from Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis

Twenty-seven percent of patients who are treated for ulcerative colitis by colectomy experience postoperative complications, according to a study in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Most patients with ulcerative colitis are successfully treated with medication, yet some have severe colitis attacks that can be life threatening. Approximately

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An Immune Culprit in IBD?

Patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis have reduced levels of an important regulator of the immune response—the receptor for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)—according to a study by Jonathan Goldstein et al. in the July issue of Gastroenterology. The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease arise from

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Does Mucosal Healing Determine Which Patients Will Recover From Ulcerative Colitis?

Lack of mucosal healing, based on endoscopic analysis, identifies patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who are not likely to respond to corticosteroid therapy, according to Sandro Ardizzone et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a prospective study, Ardizzone et al. followed 157 patients with moderate

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Surviving Childhood Cancer Increases GI Risks

Individuals who received therapy for cancer during childhood have an increased risk of developing GI complications later in life, according to Robert Goldsby et al. in the May issue of Gastroenterology. About 80% of children who receive cancer therapy survive more than 5 years; therapies can be especially toxic to

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