• Anemia—a Real Problem for Patients With IBD

Anemia—a Real Problem for Patients With IBD

Persistent or recurrent anemia is associated with severe and disabling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), researchers report in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Persistent or recurrent anemia could be used as a marker of severe disease and to identify patients who require aggressive management. Anemia is a well-recognized but underestimated problem

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  • What Gene Mutations Cause Familial Colorectal Cancers?

What Gene Mutations Cause Familial Colorectal Cancers?

Mutations in the DNA repair gene, FAN1, cause some inherited forms of colorectal cancer (CRC), researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. Identification of another gene associated with this hereditary cancer will facilitate management of patients with family histories of cancer. Germline mutations in EPCAM, APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, GREM1,

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  • Is Fecal Calprotectin a Good Marker of Crohn’s Disease Recurrence?

Is Fecal Calprotectin a Good Marker of Crohn’s Disease Recurrence?

The fecal concentration of calprotectin can be used to monitor for recurrence of Crohn’s disease, with a high enough negative predictive value that physicians can be confident they won’t miss patients with recurrent disease, researchers report in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Approximately 80% of patients with Crohn’s disease require surgery

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  • Special Issue: Food, the Immune System, and the GI Tract

Special Issue: Food, the Immune System, and the GI Tract

The digestion of food and absorption of nutrients is the principal role of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract—everyone wants to know what we should eat and how it affects our body. Interactions between food and the immune system affect our microbiome, development of food allergies, nutrition, risk for inflammatory disorders or cancer, and even

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  • Microbes go With the Flow (of Oxygen) in the Intestine

Microbes go With the Flow (of Oxygen) in the Intestine

The intestine contains a radial gradient of microbes that changes with the distribution of oxygen and nutrients, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Further study of this distribution could provide information about activities of the microbiota in the healthy and inflamed intestine. The bacteria of the intestinal live in

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  • Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Can Mesalamine Prevent Diverticulitis Recurrence?

Mesalamine is no better than placebo in preventing recurrent diverticulitis, and is not recommended for its treatment, researchers conclude from 2 international phase 3 studies. The findings are published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Diverticular disease is characterized by formation of small pouches (diverticula) that push outward through weak spots in the colon wall.  Diverticulitis

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Video: What is Causing the Serpentine Movement in this Man’s Abdomen?

In the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, physicians present a video of small bowel peristaltic movements visible from the outside of a patient with sigmoid volvulus. In their report, Foke van Delft and Elske Hoornenborg describe a 72-year-old Surinamese Hindustani man with diabetes, progressive abdominal pain, vomiting, shortness of

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Can a microRNA Control Inflammation in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis?

Loss of a non-coding RNA that regulates inflammation could contribute to development of ulcerative colitis (UC) in children, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. UC and Crohn’s disease are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases that affect adults and children. These diseases are complex, and caused by combinations of genetic and

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How Can the Gut Microbiota Contribute to Liver Disease?

Microbes that reside in colons of obese individuals produce many compounds that could contribute to development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other complications of obesity, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Microorganisms living in the human intestine (gut microbiota) affect

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Is Medicine or Surgery the Best Treatment for Crohn’s Disease?

For patients with Crohn’s disease and intra-abdominal abscesses, nonsurgical and surgical management strategies result in similar rates of abscess recurrence and complications, according to the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Crohn’s disease can progress from inflammation and ulceration to bowel damage that includes formation of abscesses, phlegmon, and

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