• FUSE Outperforms Forward-viewing Colonoscopy in Detecting Dysplasia in Patients With IBD

FUSE Outperforms Forward-viewing Colonoscopy in Detecting Dysplasia in Patients With IBD

The panoramic views obtained with full-spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) increase the number of dysplastic lesions detected in the colon, compared with conventional forward-viewing colonoscopy, researchers report in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Surveillance colonoscopy with chromoendoscopy is recommended, but conventional forward-viewing colonoscopy

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  • Hemosuccus Pancreaticus Caused by a Pancreatic Tumor

Hemosuccus Pancreaticus Caused by a Pancreatic Tumor

Researchers describe a rare cause of hemosuccus pancreaticus in a patient with pancreatic cancer. The gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by erosion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma into the colon, they show in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is defined as hemorrhage from the ampulla of Vater via the pancreatic

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  • Can Capsule Colonoscopy Accurately Detect Polyps and Adenomas?

Can Capsule Colonoscopy Accurately Detect Polyps and Adenomas?

In an average-risk screening population, capsule colonoscopy identified individuals with polyps and adenomas with high levels of specificity, researchers report in the May issue of Gastroenterology. This procedure might be useful for patients who cannot undergo colonoscopy or who had incomplete colonoscopies. Capsule endoscopy, which involves an ingestible pill-sized endoscope that

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  • Are CMS Payments Associated with Numbers of Medicare Beneficiaries in Each State?

Are CMS Payments Associated with Numbers of Medicare Beneficiaries in Each State?

Medicare and Medicaid Service payments vary greatly across the US, but are not associated with the volume of Medicare beneficiaries or overall per-capita health care costs for each state, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. There are large geographic disparities in costs of health care, including costs of

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  • What to do About Sessile Serrated Adenomas

What to do About Sessile Serrated Adenomas

Sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), characterized by the saw-toothed appearance of the colonic crypts, form and progress to colorectal cancers (CRCs) via a different pathway than conventional adenomas and are thought to contribute to 20% to 35% of all cases of CRC. Although little is known about their pathogenesis, endoscopists must be aware of the unique features of SSAs to efficiently detect

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Video: New Tool Aids Determination of Colonoscopy Surveillance Intervals

With an increased emphasis on improving quality and decreasing costs, new tools are needed to improve adherence to evidence-based practices and guidelines in endoscopy. In a video abstract, Timothy D. Imler describes an automated system that uses natural language processing (NLP) and clinical decision support to facilitate determination of colonoscopy surveillance

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Why Does Colonoscopy Protect Against Left-Sided Cancers?

Polyps with advanced pathology are significantly smaller in the right than left colon, and are therefore more likely to be missed during colonoscopy examinations, according to the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC) is decreasing, in part because colonoscopy screening is increasing, leading to

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What are the Barriers to CRC Screening?

Waiving copayments for colonoscopy examinations to detect colorectal cancer (CRC) increases the number of patients that undergo screening, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Colonoscopy is a recommended, cost-effective method of CRC screening that appears to reduce mortality, yet only half of

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Does Polyp Size Matter?

Computed tomography colonography (CTC) is a useful tool for colon cancer screening. The challenge, however, is determining which lesions are most dangerous—should some be treated aggressively and others just monitored or ignored? Does size matter? In the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Perry Pickhardt et al. assessed the

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