• Does an SVR to Therapy for HCV-associated Cirrhosis Reduce Portal Pressure?

Does an SVR to Therapy for HCV-associated Cirrhosis Reduce Portal Pressure?

A sustained virologic response (SVR) to all-oral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-associated cirrhosis significantly reduces the hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Nevertheless, almost 80% of patients maintain significant portal hypertension and have a continued risk of decompensation. In patients with compensated

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  • Medicaid Denies Almost 50% of Prescriptions for Hepatitis C Drugs in 4 States

Medicaid Denies Almost 50% of Prescriptions for Hepatitis C Drugs in 4 States

Medicaid programs in Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania denied nearly half of all claims in the past year for direct-acting antiviral (DAA) hepatitis C drugs, according to an analysis of pharmacy data presented at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases 2015 Liver Meeting. The finding confirms

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  • Bradycardia After Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in 2 Patients Receiving Amiodarone

Bradycardia After Sofosbuvir and Daclatasvir in 2 Patients Receiving Amiodarone

Two patients receiving treatment with amiodarone developed bradycardia within 2 hours after taking sofosbuvir and daclatasvir  for hepatitis C, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Patients treated with amiodarone should be continuously monitored within the first 48 hours after receiving these hepatitis C drugs, say the authors of the Brief Report. Sofosbuvir and

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  • Improving Outcomes of Patients With Fibrosing Cholestatic Hepatitis C

Improving Outcomes of Patients With Fibrosing Cholestatic Hepatitis C

Sofosbuvir-based regimens, with or without daclatasvir, greatly improve the clinical status of patients who develop fibrosing cholestatis hepatitis (FCH) after liver transplantation for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and most of the patients achieve a sustained virologic response (SVR), researchers report in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. These results

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  • Hepatitis C Drugs Might be Cost Effective but Demand Could Bust the Healthcare Bank

Hepatitis C Drugs Might be Cost Effective but Demand Could Bust the Healthcare Bank

Treating patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using recently approved direct-acting agents can be cost effective, but will also have substantial effects on healthcare costs, researchers show. Recently approved drugs cure more than 90% of patients with hepatitis C and could make the liver disease rare in the United

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New Ways to Treat HCV Infection After Liver Transplant

New direct-acting agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cure the infection when it recurs in patients with liver transplants. Researchers reported findings from 3 separate studies at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases last week in Boston. HCV is the leading

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Are Patients Receiving the Latest Anti-HCV Drugs?

Less than 20% of patients infected with the most common Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype receive the latest drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. This low percentage could result from concerns of side effects or patient

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Is SVR12 As Good As SVR24?

In patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, a sustained viral response to treatment regimens 12 weeks after therapy (SVR12) is a good indicator that the response will be maintained until week 24 (SVR 24), based on an analysis of pooled clinical trial data published in the June issue of

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New Ways to Study HCV, Genotypes 3 and 4

Researchers can now study replication of Hepatitis C virus genotypes 3 and 4 in cultured cells, described in 2 articles in the January issue of Gastroenterology. These new tools will improve our understanding of how they cause liver disease, and could lead to new treatments. HCV leads to chronic infection

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Can We Treat Chronic HCV Infection Without Interferon?

A potent combination of 2 drugs that directly target the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is effective in patients with chronic infection, and doesn’t require interferon therapy, according to an article in the December issue of Gastroenterology. Patients infected with HCV genotype-1 are usually treated with peginterferon and ribavirin, but approximately

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