• What Comes First — the Psychological Disorder or the Gastrointestinal Disorder?

What Comes First — the Psychological Disorder or the Gastrointestinal Disorder?

More patients receive a diagnosis of a mood or anxiety disorder before diagnosis of a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID), researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The findings indicate opportunities for prevention and support the role of adverse socioeconomic factors in development of FGIDs in patients

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  • Can Yoga Reduce Symptoms of IBS?

Can Yoga Reduce Symptoms of IBS?

Yoga might be a feasible and safe adjunct treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a systematic review shows in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The review found evidence for beneficial effects of yoga on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, quality of life, and anxiety, although further studies are needed. IBS is

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  • An Ex-vivo Model for Electrolyte Transport Along the Small Intestine

An Ex-vivo Model for Electrolyte Transport Along the Small Intestine

Undifferentiated or crypt-like, and differentiated or villus-like, human intestinal enteroids represent distinct points along the crypt–villus axis and can be used to characterize electrolyte transport processes along the small intestine, researchers report in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Studies of their duodenal enteroid model showed that electrogenic Na+/HCO3– cotransporter 1 in the

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Can We Treat Diarrhea by Stimulating Na+ Absorption?

Drugs designed to increase intestinal absorption of sodium might be the best approach for treatment of diarrheal diseases, according to the Advances in Translational Science article in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Acute diarrheal diseases are the second leading cause of of death in children under 5 years

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Could Differences in Gut Bacteria Cause IBS?

The bacteria that reside in the intestines of adults and children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) differ from those of healthy adults and children, according to 2 studies in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Microorganisms account for 90% of the cells in our body (many cannot even be cultured); only

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