• Does Good Oral Health Increase Risk for IBD?

Does Good Oral Health Increase Risk for IBD?

A population-based cohort study of more than 20,000 people in Sweden associated poor oral health with reduced risk for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The article, in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, reports that the protective effect increases with the severity of poor dental hygiene. Environmental factors, such as

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DDW 2016: Stem Cells Help Heal Perianal Fistulas, Increasing Rates of Colorectal Cancer in Younger Individuals, and Agents Effective Against HCV Genotypes 1–6

Researchers reported important findings on a variety of gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders at Digestive Disease Week in San Diego. – A small, phase 1 study reported that a bioprosthesis plug soaked in autologous mesenchymal stem cells helped heal refractory perianal fistulas that commonly occur in patients with Crohn’s disease. Amy

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  • As Incidence and Deaths from Other Cancers Decrease, Liver Cancer Increases in US

As Incidence and Deaths from Other Cancers Decrease, Liver Cancer Increases in US

Deaths from almost all cancers in the United States decreased from 1975 to 2012—except for liver cancer. In the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2012, published online by the National Cancer Institute, A. Blythe Ryerson et al report that the overall cancer death rates for

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  • What is the Best way to Manage Diverticulitis, and how Many People Have it?

What is the Best way to Manage Diverticulitis, and how Many People Have it?

Not all patients with multiple episodes of diverticulitis should undergo preventative surgery, shows a Markov decision model published in the January 2016 issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Elective surgery after 2 episodes produces fewer quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) than surgery after 3 episodes or conservative or medical treatments, the model found.

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Obesity Appears to Contribute to Increasing Use of Prescription Drugs

Prescription drug use in the United States increased by 8% over a 10 year period, and users of 5 or more prescription drugs almost doubled. Increases in prescriptions for specific agents appears to reflect the growing need for treatment of complications associated with the increase in overweight and obesity. The

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  • Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

People of Indian origin living in the United States have a greater than average risk for all types of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) than other American populations, researchers report in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. East Asians and Hispanics have a lower risk, similar to that of the populations still

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How Many People Have Eosinophilic Esophagitis?

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which was barely recognized 20 years ago, affects at least 150,000 people in the United States, with three-quarters being adults, report Evan Dellon et al. in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. EoE, also known as allergic esophagitis, is an allergic inflammatory disease characterized by

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Can We Increase Survival of Patients with Gastric Cancer?

Researchers have identified factors that affect life expectancy of patients with stomach cancer, reported in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Use of these factors to increase early detection of gastric adenocarcinoma could greatly increase survival times among patients. Gastric cancer is a significant cause of mortality and

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Are All Patients With IBD at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer?

Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increases risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), the risk is only substantial among patients with long-term, extensive colitis. Furthermore, CRC risk is reduced by thiopurine therapy, according to the July issue of Gastroenterology. Laurent Beaugerie et al. collected data from 19,486 patients with IBD (60% with

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Differences in HCV Infection, and Effects of Treatment, Among Countries

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have developed and spread at different rates in different countries, affecting outcomes of therapy, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. Specific details of each population must therefore be considered in designing prevention and treatment programs. Although there are many treatment options for HCV infection,

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