• Can Disruption of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Contribute to Steatohepatitis?

Can Disruption of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Contribute to Steatohepatitis?

Mice with defects in intestinal epithelial permeability develop more severe steatohepatitis when placed on a diet high in saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (HFCD) than control mice, and colon tissues from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have similar defects in intestinal epithelial permeability, researchers report in the October

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  • What Causes Different Types of Fatty Liver Disease?

What Causes Different Types of Fatty Liver Disease?

Hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis are increasing in prevalence, and can progress to histologically identical, more severe liver disease. They are associated with 3 main factors: alcohol, obesity or metabolic syndrome, and exposure to toxins. Researchers review the similarities, differences, and pathogenic mechanisms of alcohol-associated steatohepatitis (ASH), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), and toxicant-associated fatty liver

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  • Who is on the Liver Transplant Waitlist?

Who is on the Liver Transplant Waitlist?

The number of adults with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) waiting for liver transplants has almost tripled in the last 10 years, researchers report in the March issue of Gastroenterology. NASH is now the second leading liver disease of adults awaiting liver transplantation in the United States, the researchers found. The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty

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How Can the Gut Microbiota Contribute to Liver Disease?

Microbes that reside in colons of obese individuals produce many compounds that could contribute to development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and other complications of obesity, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Microorganisms living in the human intestine (gut microbiota) affect

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How Common is Portal Hypertension in Patients With NAFLD?

Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at risk for portal hypertension and esophageal varices, according to the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The study also shows that factors such as advanced liver disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity can be used to identify patients most likely

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