• What are the Roles for Chemokines in Liver Disease?

What are the Roles for Chemokines in Liver Disease?

Sustained hepatic inflammation contributes to the progression of chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In the September issue of Gastroenterology, Fabio Marra and Frank Tacke review the roles of chemokines in liver inflammation and disease progression. In the liver, chemokines regulate the migration and activities of hepatocytes, Kupffer

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Podcast: How Does Fatty Liver Affect Risk for Cardiovascular Disease?

Modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease—particularly dyslipidemia—is required to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In a Perspective article published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kathleen E. Corey and Naga Chalasani discuss the increased risk of cardiovascular disease among patients with NAFLD, and strategies

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How Can We Tell if Patients are Still at Risk for HCC after HCV Therapy?

For patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection, high levels of α-fetoprotein after therapy can identify those at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In persons with chronic HCV infection, lack of sustained virologic response (SVR) 24 weeks after the end

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  • What is the Best Way to Care for Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

What is the Best Way to Care for Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

Although alcohol-related liver disease is the 8th most common cause of mortality in the US and the 2nd leading cause of mortality among all gastrointestinal diseases, there are few therapeutic options for patients or resources to support identification of new therapies. However, treatment approaches are being developed; a review in

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How Does a High-Fat Diet Contribute to Pancreatic Cancer?

A high-fat diet can promote development of pancreatic cancer, but cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitors prevent this process, according to a mouse study published in the December issue of Gastroenterology. The mechanisms appear to involve activation of oncogenic KRAS and upregulation of COX2, which promotes pancreatic inflammation. Increased body mass index and

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Are Patients Receiving the Latest Anti-HCV Drugs?

Less than 20% of patients infected with the most common Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype receive the latest drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. This low percentage could result from concerns of side effects or patient

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Can We Prevent Portal Vein Thrombosis in Patients With Cirrhosis?

The anti-clotting agent enoxaparin prevents portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in patients with cirrhosis, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. PVT can lead to portal hypertension and reduce the blood supply to the liver—some patients with acute or extensive PVT develop severe gastrointestinal bleeding, ascites, or intestinal ischemia, which can progress and become

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Differences in HCV Infection, and Effects of Treatment, Among Countries

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have developed and spread at different rates in different countries, affecting outcomes of therapy, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. Specific details of each population must therefore be considered in designing prevention and treatment programs. Although there are many treatment options for HCV infection,

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How Common is Portal Hypertension in Patients With NAFLD?

Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at risk for portal hypertension and esophageal varices, according to the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The study also shows that factors such as advanced liver disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity can be used to identify patients most likely

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What Factors Predict Recovery From Chronic HBV Infection?

A low and rapidly decreasing level of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is a good sign for patients with chronic HBV infection, according to the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Tracking progression of chronic HBV infection can be complicated—patients can have high viral loads with no symptoms, and

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