• A New Approach to Hepatitis B Therapy?

A New Approach to Hepatitis B Therapy?

Cyclophilins are involved in multiple steps of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle in hepatocytes—cyclophilin inhibitors reduce viral replication and HBV envelope protein production and secretion, researchers report in the February issue of Gastroenterology. The cyclophilin inhibitor alisporivir, combined with the HBV polymerase inhibitor, reduces markers of HBV infection

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New Ways to Treat HCV Infection After Liver Transplant

New direct-acting agents against hepatitis C virus (HCV) can cure the infection when it recurs in patients with liver transplants. Researchers reported findings from 3 separate studies at the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases last week in Boston. HCV is the leading

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  • What are the Roles for Chemokines in Liver Disease?

What are the Roles for Chemokines in Liver Disease?

Sustained hepatic inflammation contributes to the progression of chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis C and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In the September issue of Gastroenterology, Fabio Marra and Frank Tacke review the roles of chemokines in liver inflammation and disease progression. In the liver, chemokines regulate the migration and activities of hepatocytes, Kupffer

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How Can We Tell if Patients are Still at Risk for HCC after HCV Therapy?

For patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection, high levels of α-fetoprotein after therapy can identify those at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In persons with chronic HCV infection, lack of sustained virologic response (SVR) 24 weeks after the end

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  • Does Cancer Treatment Bring Back HCV Infection?

Does Cancer Treatment Bring Back HCV Infection?

Treated hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections do not return after patients receive chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy, researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Cancer chemotherapy leads to HCV reactivation in patients with chronic infections, but little is known about the effect of chemotherapy on HCV infections

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Are Patients Receiving the Latest Anti-HCV Drugs?

Less than 20% of patients infected with the most common Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype receive the latest drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. This low percentage could result from concerns of side effects or patient

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What are the Effects of Albumin in Patients With SBP?

Albumin infusion prevents renal impairment and reduces mortality among patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), according to a meta-analysis published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. SBP is a common bacterial infection among cirrhotic patients and a dangerous complication of ascites. Mortality can reach 30% despite antibiotic

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Differences in HCV Infection, and Effects of Treatment, Among Countries

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have developed and spread at different rates in different countries, affecting outcomes of therapy, according to the October issue of Gastroenterology. Specific details of each population must therefore be considered in designing prevention and treatment programs. Although there are many treatment options for HCV infection,

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A Special Issue on Viral Hepatitis

The May issue of Gastroenterology features a very special supplement—“Viral Hepatitis: A Changing Field”—comprising 17 review and commentary articles from international leaders in hepatitis treatment and research. The issue provides insight into the rapid progress made in the treatment and management of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as our

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Why are Some Immunized Children Still At Risk for HBV Infection?

Despite immunization, children born to mothers with replicating HBV (marked by hepatitis B e antigen, or HBeAg) are still at risk for infection, according to the April issue of Gastroenterology. Mother-to-infant transmission is the major cause of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among immunized children. There have been proposals to

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