• Does Colony Stimulating Factor Increase Survival of Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

Does Colony Stimulating Factor Increase Survival of Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

In a pilot study from the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, colony stimulating factor 3 (CSF3, also called GCSF) improved liver function and increased survival times in patients with severe alcohol-associated hepatitis (AH), compared with standard therapy. Addition of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) to GCSF did not improve patient outcomes. Patients

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A Parasitic Infection From Sashimi

Researchers report a case of anisakiasis, caused by nematodes of the genus Anisakis—a parasite transmitted to humans through raw seafood such as sushi and sashimi. In the May issue of Gastroenterology, Kaori Ikegami et al describe the case of a 47-year-old man who arrived at the emergency department with severe epigastric pain.

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  • Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms, although uncommon, are an important cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of all ages, researchers remind readers in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Puneet Chhabra and Deepak K. Bhasin describe the case of a 72-year-old man with Parkinson disease who presented with fatigue, dyspnea on exertion, and

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Gastrointestinal Bleeding Caused by Gastric Tuberculosis

Researchers describe a case of gastric tuberculosis that led to GI bleeding in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Vishal Sharma et al report that a 30-year-old man who was a resident of North India presented to emergency services with 2 episodes of painless hematemesis. He did not have a history of

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  • What are the Effects of Prednisolone in Patients With Severe Alcoholic Liver Disease?

What are the Effects of Prednisolone in Patients With Severe Alcoholic Liver Disease?

Infections are frequent in patients with severe alcoholic liver disease, but are only independently associated with mortality when patients receive prednisolone, researchers report in the April issue of Gastroenterology. This could offset prednisolone’s therapeutic benefit. This study’s senior author, Mark Thursz, discusses the findings in a video abstract. As with

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  • Does Good Oral Health Increase Risk for IBD?

Does Good Oral Health Increase Risk for IBD?

A population-based cohort study of more than 20,000 people in Sweden associated poor oral health with reduced risk for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The article, in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, reports that the protective effect increases with the severity of poor dental hygiene. Environmental factors, such as

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  • A New Pathway for Transmitting HBV DNA?

A New Pathway for Transmitting HBV DNA?

Extracellular vesicles carry HBV DNA as cargo that can be transmitted to other hepatocytes, researchers report in the March issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Their findings identify an antibody-neutralization–resistant route of HBV infection. Approximately 350 million people are chronically infected by HBV worldwide, and some of these

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  • Hepatosplenic Lesions from Cat Scratch Disease

Hepatosplenic Lesions from Cat Scratch Disease

Researchers describe an unusual case of cat scratch disease, with hepatosplenic involvement, in the January 2017 issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Sean K. Verma et al report on a 28-year-old man with no past medical history presented with fevers, chills, abdominal pain, night sweats, 3 weeks of weight loss,

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  • Can Direct-acting Antivirals Treatment of HCV Reactivate Herpesvirus Infection?

Can Direct-acting Antivirals Treatment of HCV Reactivate Herpesvirus Infection?

Researchers report reactivation of herpesvirus in 10 patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection treated with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents in the November issue of Clincial Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Christie Perelló et al performed a case series analysis of reactivation of herpesvirus in patients with HCV infection treated with DAA

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  • What is the Best Way to Predict Disease Progression in Patients With Inactive HBV?

What is the Best Way to Predict Disease Progression in Patients With Inactive HBV?

In patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection who are negative for HBe antigen (HBeAg), monitoring levels of HB surface antigen (HBsAg) can predict disease progression, researchers report in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Most persons chronically infected with HBV clear HBeAg and enter an inactive carrier phase, characterized by low or undetectable

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