• How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

Bacteria in the small intestine metabolize gluten differently, to increase or decrease its immunogenicity, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This interaction between microbes and gluten could help determine the risk for autoimmune enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals and underlie the reported association between dysbiosis and celiac disease.

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  • Can Disruption of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Contribute to Steatohepatitis?

Can Disruption of the Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Contribute to Steatohepatitis?

Mice with defects in intestinal epithelial permeability develop more severe steatohepatitis when placed on a diet high in saturated fat, fructose, and cholesterol (HFCD) than control mice, and colon tissues from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have similar defects in intestinal epithelial permeability, researchers report in the October

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  • Does Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation Benefit Patients With Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis?

Does Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation Benefit Patients With Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis?

In patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis, total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) reduces pain and requirements for narcotic therapy, and increases quality of life, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. This treatment should be considered when medical and endoscopic therapies have failed. Recurrent acute pancreatitis, caused

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  • Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Dysbiosis contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by altering colonic expression of genes that regulate inflammation and the immune response, researchers report in the July issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been associated with IBD. However, it is not

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Pyoderma Gangrenosum in Fingers of Patient With Crohn’s Disease

In the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, researchers describe a patient with Crohn’s disease who developed pyoderma gangrenosum in an unusual location. Faisal Inayat and Abu Hurairah describe a 40-year-old woman who came into the hospital with bilateral, mild, localized pain and discoloration of the fingernails for 10 days (see picture).

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  • Can we Identify People With IBD Before Symptoms Develop?

Can we Identify People With IBD Before Symptoms Develop?

People have high plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL6) and c-reactive protein years before they are diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. These markers of systemic inflammation could be features of early-stage disease used to identify patients at risk. Crohn’s

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  • Genetic Variants Associated with IBD Alter Immune Regulatory Signals from Beneficial Microbes

Genetic Variants Associated with IBD Alter Immune Regulatory Signals from Beneficial Microbes

Polymorphisms in susceptibility genes appear to promote development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by altering the abilities of immune cells to sense protective signals from the microbiome, researchers report. These findings help fill the missing link between genetic risk variants for IBD and dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome. More than

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  • What Happens to Patients With Markers of Celiac Disease but no Symptoms?

What Happens to Patients With Markers of Celiac Disease but no Symptoms?

A 3-year study of adults with potential celiac disease found most to have symptoms, and that these adults improve after gluten withdrawal, as reported in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The study also shows that patients without symptoms should not go on gluten-free diets, because they are unlikely

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  • Do NSAIDs Prevent PEP?

Do NSAIDs Prevent PEP?

Rectal indomethacin does not prevent pancreatitis following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), researchers report from a randomized controlled study published in the April issue of Gastroenterology. These findings contradict more than a decade of evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) decrease the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). Acute pancreatitis is the

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  • Gut Microbes Affect Extent of Brain Injury After Stroke

Gut Microbes Affect Extent of Brain Injury After Stroke

Altering the intestinal microbiota of mice can reduce the extent of brain damage after a stroke, researchers found. These findings provide a previously unrecognized link between the intestine and the brain. The composition of the intestinal microbiome affects development of the immune system and metabolic processes, and is altered in

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