• This is Your Brain on Anti-TNF Therapy

This is Your Brain on Anti-TNF Therapy

Anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents rapidly reduce pain perception in brains of patients with Crohn’s disease, researchers show in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This observation could explain how clinical disease activity is often reduced long before signs of mucosal healing. Patients with Crohn’s disease treated with anti-TNF agents often report reductions in abdominal pain

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  • Anemia—a Real Problem for Patients With IBD

Anemia—a Real Problem for Patients With IBD

Persistent or recurrent anemia is associated with severe and disabling inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), researchers report in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Persistent or recurrent anemia could be used as a marker of severe disease and to identify patients who require aggressive management. Anemia is a well-recognized but underestimated problem

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  • What are the Effects of Antiviral Therapy in Patients With IBD and CMV Infection?

What are the Effects of Antiviral Therapy in Patients With IBD and CMV Infection?

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection complicates inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anti-viral therapy reduces the need for bowel surgery, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The benefits of anti-viral treatment are greatest for patients with high-grade disease, they show. CMV infection is more common in patients with

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  • Is Fecal Calprotectin a Good Marker of Crohn’s Disease Recurrence?

Is Fecal Calprotectin a Good Marker of Crohn’s Disease Recurrence?

The fecal concentration of calprotectin can be used to monitor for recurrence of Crohn’s disease, with a high enough negative predictive value that physicians can be confident they won’t miss patients with recurrent disease, researchers report in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Approximately 80% of patients with Crohn’s disease require surgery

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  • Which Patients with Early-stage Ulcerative Colitis Have the Worst Prognoses?

Which Patients with Early-stage Ulcerative Colitis Have the Worst Prognoses?

It is a challenge to accurately identify patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis (UC) who are at highest risk for a poor outcome and therefore might require salvage therapy. In a Perspective article in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Walter Reinisch et al present prognostic factors for adults with newly

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  • Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

People of Indian origin living in the United States have a greater than average risk for all types of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) than other American populations, researchers report in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. East Asians and Hispanics have a lower risk, similar to that of the populations still

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  • Chronic use of Narcotics Among Children with IBD

Chronic use of Narcotics Among Children with IBD

Chronic use of narcotics is common among children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)—particularly among those with anxiety and depression, researchers report in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Identifying and treating psychological disorders could reduce symptoms that lead to narcotic use and their complications in these patients. Narcotics are prescribed

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  • Video: Which Patients with Crohn’s Disease Need a CT Scan?

Video: Which Patients with Crohn’s Disease Need a CT Scan?

Researchers have developed a system to identify patients with Crohn’s disease who do not require computed tomography (CT) evaluation, described by Shail M. Govani et al  in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The system uses laboratory test results to avoid CT analysis, and thereby unnecessary exposure to radiation and increased cancer risk. People who come to the emergency department with

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In Treating Crohn’s Disease, Earlier is Better

Patients receiving medical therapies when they have more complicated stages of Crohn’s disease (CD) are more likely to require surgery, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The disease is most-effectively treated by drugs at its early, inflammatory stages. Patients have a 40%–71% risk for requiring

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Are Mitochondria Involved in Ulcerative Colitis?

Changes in mitochondrial DNA that increase levels of ATP in the intestinal mucosa protect mice from colitis, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to increase mitochondrial ATP production by intestinal epithelial cells might therefore be developed to treat patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Characteristics of UC include reduced levels

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