• What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

The most reliable factors associated with symptom recurrence after anti-reflux surgery for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are a primary complaint of extraesophageal reflux symptoms and lack preoperative response to acid-suppression therapy, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Approximately 10% of the US population has

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  • LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

Patients receiving laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) had significantly greater long-term reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure than patients given esomeprazole, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, both treatments controlled symptoms in most patients, and esophageal and gastric pH were not

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  • 5 Hospitalized and 1 Dead in Clinical Trial in France

5 Hospitalized and 1 Dead in Clinical Trial in France

Five men were hospitalized and 1 died after a drug trial in France, the country’s health minister announced on January 15. Marisol Touraine, the minister for social affairs, health, and women’s rights, said in a statement that her office was informed the evening of January 14 about a “serious accident”

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  • A New Approach to Hepatitis B Therapy?

A New Approach to Hepatitis B Therapy?

Cyclophilins are involved in multiple steps of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) life cycle in hepatocytes—cyclophilin inhibitors reduce viral replication and HBV envelope protein production and secretion, researchers report in the February issue of Gastroenterology. The cyclophilin inhibitor alisporivir, combined with the HBV polymerase inhibitor, reduces markers of HBV infection

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Are Patients Who Take Continuous NSAIDs Receiving Gastroprotection?

Among patients who continuously take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a third of co-prescriptions for drugs to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) damage are not renewed within the next 2 years. This discontinuation increases patients’ risk of stomach pain, inflammation, or ulcers, according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients

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