• Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms Cause GI Bleeding

Hookworms, although uncommon, are an important cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients of all ages, researchers remind readers in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Puneet Chhabra and Deepak K. Bhasin describe the case of a 72-year-old man with Parkinson disease who presented with fatigue, dyspnea on exertion, and

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  • 3-D Imaging of T-cell Localization in Inflamed Colon Tissues

3-D Imaging of T-cell Localization in Inflamed Colon Tissues

Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) provides accurate 3-dimensional images of inflammed intestine of mice with colitis, researchers show in a Gastroenterology in Motion article and video in the October issue of Gastroenterology. The authors demonstrate use of the technology to analyze migration of human T cells in colons of mice with colitis. Improved techniques are

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  • Could the Microbiota Link Metabolic Syndrome With Inflammation?

Could the Microbiota Link Metabolic Syndrome With Inflammation?

Bacterial encroachment—shrinking of the bug-free zone adjacent to the colonic epithelium—is a feature of metabolic syndrome, researchers report in the September issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The findings could explain the relationship between diabetes and inflammation. Mucoid structures that coat the epithelium keep the intestinal microbiota at

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  • The Case of the Missing Acupuncture Needle – Solved by 3-D CT

The Case of the Missing Acupuncture Needle – Solved by 3-D CT

Researchers describe the loss and internal migration of an acupuncture needle, and its recovery using 3-dimensional reconstruction computed tomography (CT), in the July issue of Gastroenterology. An-qi He et al, report the case of a 62-year-old woman in China who presented with abdominal pain in the left lower quadrant. Her “needle-like abdominal

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  • What Causes Wheat Sensitivity in People Without Celiac Disease?

What Causes Wheat Sensitivity in People Without Celiac Disease?

Gluten-containing cereals have high concentrations of amylase-trypsin inhibitors (ATIs), which activate innate immunity via the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), researchers report in the April issue of Gastroenterology. These ATIs are resistant to proteases and heat, and increase intestinal inflammation by activating intestinal and mesenteric lymph node myeloid cells. Wheat is

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  • What is the Active Ingredient in FMT for CDI?

What is the Active Ingredient in FMT for CDI?

Sterile fecal filtrates—containing bacterial debris, proteins, antimicrobial compounds, metabolic products, and microbial DNA, rather than intact microorganisms—appear to be effective for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), researchers report in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy of recurrent CDI—a single treatment resolves

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  • How Does Transforming Growth Factor beta Suppress Colorectal Tumor Development?

How Does Transforming Growth Factor beta Suppress Colorectal Tumor Development?

Researchers review the mechanisms by which loss of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) proteins contribute to development and progression of colorectal cancer in the January 2017 issue of Gastroenterology. Development and progression of colorectal cancer involve loss of tumor suppressor proteins, including transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family members. In colon

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  • Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

The intestinal microbiota of many healthy, first-degree relatives of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is dysbiotic, signifying a pre-disease state, low-level inflammation, and susceptibility to IBD, researchers report in the November issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Changes in the intestinal microbiome are involved in the pathogenesis

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  • How Does Inflammation Lead to Anemia?

How Does Inflammation Lead to Anemia?

Researchers report a mechanism by which inflammation contributes to development of anemia in the November issue of Gastroenterology. The process involves increased liver expression of a microRNA that reduces production of erythropoietin in kidney. Strategies to block this miRNA might help prevent anemia in patients with chronic inflammation. Anemia is associated

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  • How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

Bacteria in the small intestine metabolize gluten differently, to increase or decrease its immunogenicity, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This interaction between microbes and gluten could help determine the risk for autoimmune enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals and underlie the reported association between dysbiosis and celiac disease.

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