• What is the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in Patients with Low-Risk IPMNs?

What is the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in Patients with Low-Risk IPMNs?

Low-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms have an almost 8% chance of progressing to pancreatic cancer within 10 years, whereas higher-risk IPMNs have almost 25% chance, reports a systematic review and meta-analysis in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Continued long-term surveillance is therefore important for patients with low-risk, as

Read more
  • Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Nonselective beta blockers (NSBBs) do not significantly increase the risk of death in patients with cirrhosis and ascites or refractory ascites, researchers report in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the position that NSBBs be routinely withheld from patients with

Read more

Is Stretta an Effective Treatment for GERD?

An expensive radiofrequency ablation technique known as Stretta does not benefit patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies, Seth Lipka et al found no evidence that Stretta normalized esophageal pH values, augmented lower esophageal

Read more
  • Do Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Increase Risk for GI Bleeding?

Do Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Increase Risk for GI Bleeding?

Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increases risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) by 55%—and even more among patients also taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory or antiplatelet drugs, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Risk might be reduced significantly by concomitant use of acid-suppressing drugs. Selective serotonin

Read more

What is the Best Treatment for Microscopic Colitis?

The corticosteroid budesonide is the most effective treatment for patients with microscopic colitis (MC), according to a meta-analysis in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, once patients stop taking this drug, the rate of symptom relapse is high. MC is an inflammatory disorder of the colon that

Read more

An Aspirin a Day Won’t Kill You, But it Might Cause GI Bleeding

Taking an aspirin a day reduces the risk for death, but increases odds of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, according to a large meta-analysis published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Daily low doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, also known as aspirin, 75 to 325 mg per day) are

Read more