• Does Asthma Increase Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

Does Asthma Increase Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

A population-based case–control study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology associates asthma with later development of Crohn’s disease (CD) and with ulcerative colitis (UC). Although the etiology of asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are not well understood, they both involve complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors and the

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  • What is the Active Ingredient in FMT for CDI?

What is the Active Ingredient in FMT for CDI?

Sterile fecal filtrates—containing bacterial debris, proteins, antimicrobial compounds, metabolic products, and microbial DNA, rather than intact microorganisms—appear to be effective for treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), researchers report in the March issue of Gastroenterology. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective therapy of recurrent CDI—a single treatment resolves

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  • Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

Do Relatives of Patients With IBD Also Have Intestinal Dysbiosis?

The intestinal microbiota of many healthy, first-degree relatives of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is dysbiotic, signifying a pre-disease state, low-level inflammation, and susceptibility to IBD, researchers report in the November issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Changes in the intestinal microbiome are involved in the pathogenesis

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  • How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

How Could the Intestinal Microbiota Contribute to Celiac Disease?

Bacteria in the small intestine metabolize gluten differently, to increase or decrease its immunogenicity, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This interaction between microbes and gluten could help determine the risk for autoimmune enteropathy in genetically susceptible individuals and underlie the reported association between dysbiosis and celiac disease.

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  • Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Can Microbial Dysbiosis Cause Colonic Inflammation?

Dysbiosis contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by altering colonic expression of genes that regulate inflammation and the immune response, researchers report in the July issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology. An altered intestinal microbiota composition has been associated with IBD. However, it is not

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  • Genetic Variants Associated with IBD Alter Immune Regulatory Signals from Beneficial Microbes

Genetic Variants Associated with IBD Alter Immune Regulatory Signals from Beneficial Microbes

Polymorphisms in susceptibility genes appear to promote development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) by altering the abilities of immune cells to sense protective signals from the microbiome, researchers report. These findings help fill the missing link between genetic risk variants for IBD and dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome. More than

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  • Can Nutritional Therapy Help Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy?

Can Nutritional Therapy Help Patients with Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy?

Nutritional therapy for patients with cirrhosis and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) not only improves their nutritional status, but increases cognitive function, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and liver function and reduces hospitalization, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. HE is a spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities that develops in

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  • Intestinal Microbiota Protect Children From Malnutrition

Intestinal Microbiota Protect Children From Malnutrition

Three new studies show that intestinal bacteria protect children from malnutrition and allow them to benefit from breast milk. Malnutrition, the world’s leading cause of death before age 5, is a persistent challenge that is not always remedied by improvements in nutrition. This is because the community of gut microbes regulate growth,

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  • Restoring Vaginal Microbiota to C-Section Babies

Restoring Vaginal Microbiota to C-Section Babies

Babies born by Cesarean section (C-section) are not always exposed to bacteria and other microbes present in the birth canals of their mothers—a factor that some studies have associated with health risks later in life. Now, researchers present preliminary data indicating that microbial communities could be at least partly restored

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  • Gut Microbiome Determines Efficacy of Cancer Immunotherapy

Gut Microbiome Determines Efficacy of Cancer Immunotherapy

Specific groups of intestinal microbes can boost the anti-tumor effects of cancer immunotherapies in mice, researchers show. Cancer immunotherapies that block immune inhibitory pathways have been tested in patients with several tumor types, but responses have varied. A study published in Science, while not the first to link gut microbes

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