• The Iceman’s Gut Microbes Cometh

The Iceman’s Gut Microbes Cometh

Analysis of microbes from the gut of the Iceman—a 5300-year-old Copper Age European glacial mummy—provides insights into not only his health status right before he was murdered, but migration patterns of humans and their microbiota. Helicobacter pylori, one of the most prevalent human pathogens, is globally dispersed but has a

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How Good Gut Microbes Resist Inflammation

Gut commensal bacteria survive inflammation by making a simple switch to their protective coats, researchers show. When harmful microbes like salmonella infect the gut, the innate immune system produces antimicrobial peptides to kill them. But these pathogenic microbes are often similar to the commensal microbes that live in the gut—it was

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  • What are the Long-Term Effects of Gastrointestinal Infections During Childhood?

What are the Long-Term Effects of Gastrointestinal Infections During Childhood?

An analysis of children affected by a Salmonella enteritidis outbreak more than 20 years ago provides evidence that pathogen-induced gastroenteritis during childhood is a risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults. The findings from this long-term study are published in the July issue of Gastroenterology. Functional dyspepsia and IBS affect

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  • Does Getting Rid of H pylori Stop Gastric Cancer’s Return?

Does Getting Rid of H pylori Stop Gastric Cancer’s Return?

Eradication of Helicobacter pylori after endoscopic resection of gastric lesions doesn’t prevent later development of new stomach tumors, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. H pylori infection can lead to gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia or cancer—specifically non-cardia gastric cancer. It does so by inducing inflammation

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What Does the Appendix Do, Anyway?

The appendix protects against recurrent infection by Clostridium difficile (C difficile) and possibly other pathogenic bacteria, according to a study published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Although the human appendix is considered to be expendable, it contains gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), which processes antigen and regulates

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