• What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

The most reliable factors associated with symptom recurrence after anti-reflux surgery for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are a primary complaint of extraesophageal reflux symptoms and lack preoperative response to acid-suppression therapy, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Approximately 10% of the US population has

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  • LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

Patients receiving laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) had significantly greater long-term reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure than patients given esomeprazole, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, both treatments controlled symptoms in most patients, and esophageal and gastric pH were not

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  • Do Proton Pump Inhibitors Reduce the Need for Phlebotomy in Patients With Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

Do Proton Pump Inhibitors Reduce the Need for Phlebotomy in Patients With Hereditary Hemochromatosis?

In certain patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for 2 or more years significantly reduced the number of phlebotomies required to maintain serum levels below 100 μg/L, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. HH is one of the most common

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  • How Might PPIs Promote C difficile infection?

How Might PPIs Promote C difficile infection?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) do not have a large effect on microbial diversity of the colon, but do affect specific taxa, including Streptococcaceae and Enterococcaceae, which mediate resistance to Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. This finding might provide a mechanism by which these drugs increase risk for CDI.

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Is Stretta an Effective Treatment for GERD?

An expensive radiofrequency ablation technique known as Stretta does not benefit patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies, Seth Lipka et al found no evidence that Stretta normalized esophageal pH values, augmented lower esophageal

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  • New Approaches to IBS and IBD, But Concerns About PPIs, Highlighted at DDW

New Approaches to IBS and IBD, But Concerns About PPIs, Highlighted at DDW

A new test to identify diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS) and a new class of drugs to treat ulcerative colitis were presented at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) in Washington DC, May 15–19. Researchers also warned that many residents of nursing homes are being inappropriately given proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Mark Pimentel

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What to do About Gastric Polyps

When clinicians detect a gastric polyp during endoscopy, they are faced with many questions: does the polyp need to be excised, or can a biopsy sample be collected and analyzed? Which polyps should be biopsied? Should patients then be followed, and how? In the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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Are Patients Who Take Continuous NSAIDs Receiving Gastroprotection?

Among patients who continuously take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a third of co-prescriptions for drugs to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) damage are not renewed within the next 2 years. This discontinuation increases patients’ risk of stomach pain, inflammation, or ulcers, according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients

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Can Proton Pump Inhibitors Prevent Esophageal Cancer?

Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy reduces risk of esophageal cancer in patients with Barrett’s esophagus (BE), according to the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In BE, the squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus is replaced by metaplastic columnar epithelium, as a result of chronic exposure to stomach acid. Patients

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How Dangerous Are H pylori-Negative Idiopathic Bleeding Ulcers?

Patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer not caused by Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at considerable risk of recurrent bleeding and death. Furthermore, acid-suppressive drugs do not protect these patients, according to the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Peptic ulcers that are not associated

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