How Common is Portal Hypertension in Patients With NAFLD?

Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are at risk for portal hypertension and esophageal varices, according to the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The study also shows that factors such as advanced liver disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity can be used to identify patients most likely

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Why are Some Immunized Children Still At Risk for HBV Infection?

Despite immunization, children born to mothers with replicating HBV (marked by hepatitis B e antigen, or HBeAg) are still at risk for infection, according to the April issue of Gastroenterology. Mother-to-infant transmission is the major cause of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among immunized children. There have been proposals to

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An Aspirin a Day Won’t Kill You, But it Might Cause GI Bleeding

Taking an aspirin a day reduces the risk for death, but increases odds of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, according to a large meta-analysis published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Daily low doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, also known as aspirin, 75 to 325 mg per day) are

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Coffee Therapy for Hepatitis C?

Drinking 3 cups of coffee a day helps patients with hepatitis C respond to treatment, report Neal Freedman et al. in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Coffee reduces risks of progression of liver diseases and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, so Freedman et al. investigated whether it also had benefits for patients

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Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Prevent Colorectal Cancer (for Some)

Aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) in some people but not others, according to the March issue of Gastroenterology. Andrew Chan et al. found that these drugs reduce the risk of CRC only in women with high levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR-2), a

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In CRC Screening, Location Matters

Colonoscopy screening reduces mortality from cancers of the distal, but not proximal, colon, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Harminder Singh et al. studied mortality from CRC among more than 55,000 people that had received screening colonoscopies, compared with the general population. They found that

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