• What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

What Happens When You Have Dysphagia After Anti-Reflux Surgery?

In patients who develop dysphagia within a few weeks after fundoplication surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), most symptoms resolve with time and require no intervention. However, patients with clinically significant dysphagia months after this surgery benefit from endoscopic dilation, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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  • REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

REVIEW: How Does Barrett’s Esophagus Develop?

Mechanisms of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) pathogenesis are discussed in a review article by Jianwen Que et al in the August issue of Gastroenterology, including cell transdifferentiation and transcommitment. The authors discuss potential cells of origin for Barrett’s metaplasia, and the possibility that there could be more than 1 type of BE

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  • What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

What Factors Associate With Symptom Recurrence After Anti-reflux Surgery for GERD?

The most reliable factors associated with symptom recurrence after anti-reflux surgery for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are a primary complaint of extraesophageal reflux symptoms and lack preoperative response to acid-suppression therapy, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Approximately 10% of the US population has

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  • LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

LARS vs PPIs for Treatment of GERD?

Patients receiving laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (LARS) for chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) had significantly greater long-term reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure than patients given esomeprazole, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, both treatments controlled symptoms in most patients, and esophageal and gastric pH were not

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Is Stretta an Effective Treatment for GERD?

An expensive radiofrequency ablation technique known as Stretta does not benefit patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a meta-analysis of randomized controlled studies, Seth Lipka et al found no evidence that Stretta normalized esophageal pH values, augmented lower esophageal

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Putting a Cap on Acid Reflux

Researchers show that a polysaccharide ‘raft’ can float on top of acid in the stomach to block its backflow into the esophagus. It reduces reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to a clinical trial the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. GERD is a common condition

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Does a Response to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Indicate GERD?

Just because a patient’s upper gastrointestinal symptoms are alleviated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) doesn’t necessarily mean that they have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The efficacy of PPI therapy often is tested to determine whether patients’ symptoms are acid-related and

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Many Patients Without GERD Continue to Take PPIs

More than 42% of patients with negative results from pH monitoring studies continue proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, despite evidence that they do not have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. PPI therapy is effective for about 75% of patients with GERD

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New Word on GERD?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are useful for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although heartburn completely resolves in only 40% of patients that take these drugs. Furthermore, long-term use of PPIs can increase risk for pneumonia, Clostridium difficile infection, and bone disorders, so other therapeutic strategies are needed. In the August

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