Do Continuous-flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices Increase Risk of GI Bleeding and Thrombosis?

Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices increase the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and thromboembolic events, researchers report in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation results in improved survival and quality of life in patients with advanced heart failure. Continuous-flow LVADs (CF-LVADs) are

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Podcast: How Does Fatty Liver Affect Risk for Cardiovascular Disease?

Modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease—particularly dyslipidemia—is required to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In a Perspective article published in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kathleen E. Corey and Naga Chalasani discuss the increased risk of cardiovascular disease among patients with NAFLD, and strategies

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How Can We Tell if Patients are Still at Risk for HCC after HCV Therapy?

For patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus infection, high levels of α-fetoprotein after therapy can identify those at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), researchers report in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In persons with chronic HCV infection, lack of sustained virologic response (SVR) 24 weeks after the end

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Are IBD Drugs Safe During Pregnancy?

Researchers find no evidence that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during pregnancy, or medical treatment for IBD during pregnancy, increases risk for congenital abnormalities in children. The findings, based on a large database analysis, are published in the January issue of Gastroenterology. IBD frequently affects women of reproductive age, and is often

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Can We Increase Survival of Patients with Gastric Cancer?

Researchers have identified factors that affect life expectancy of patients with stomach cancer, reported in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Use of these factors to increase early detection of gastric adenocarcinoma could greatly increase survival times among patients. Gastric cancer is a significant cause of mortality and

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How Does a High-Fat Diet Contribute to Pancreatic Cancer?

A high-fat diet can promote development of pancreatic cancer, but cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitors prevent this process, according to a mouse study published in the December issue of Gastroenterology. The mechanisms appear to involve activation of oncogenic KRAS and upregulation of COX2, which promotes pancreatic inflammation. Increased body mass index and

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What is the Best Treatment for Esophageal Adenocarcioma?

Patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) who receive endoscopic therapy survive as long as patients treated by surgery, according to the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Esophageal cancer is a highly fatal malignancy—approximate 19% of patients survive 5 years. The incidence of EAC, the most common form of esophageal

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Which Patients With Barrett’s Esophagus Will Develop Esophageal Cancer?

Researchers have found markers to identify patients with Barrett’s esophagus (BE) at greatest risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. These are described in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In patients with BE, part of the normal stratified squamous epithelium of the lower esophagus is replaced with metaplastic columnar

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Are All Patients With IBD at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer?

Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increases risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), the risk is only substantial among patients with long-term, extensive colitis. Furthermore, CRC risk is reduced by thiopurine therapy, according to the July issue of Gastroenterology. Laurent Beaugerie et al. collected data from 19,486 patients with IBD (60% with

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How Can We Screen for Pancreatic Cancer and its Precursors?

Individuals with invasive pancreatic cancer or high-grade dysplasia can be identified based on a specific DNA mutation in pancreatic juice samples from the duodena, according to the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Tests for mutant TP53 might be developed to improve the diagnosis of and screening for pancreatic cancer and its precursors.

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