• What are the Effects of Prednisolone in Patients With Severe Alcoholic Liver Disease?

What are the Effects of Prednisolone in Patients With Severe Alcoholic Liver Disease?

Infections are frequent in patients with severe alcoholic liver disease, but are only independently associated with mortality when patients receive prednisolone, researchers report in the April issue of Gastroenterology. This could offset prednisolone’s therapeutic benefit. This study’s senior author, Mark Thursz, discusses the findings in a video abstract. As with

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  • Video Abstract: Pros and Cons of Continued Aspirin Use in Patients with Lower GI Bleeding

Video Abstract: Pros and Cons of Continued Aspirin Use in Patients with Lower GI Bleeding

In aspirin users with a history of lower gastrointestinal bleeding, continued aspirin use increases risk of recurrent bleeding by almost 3-fold, but reduces risk of serious cardiovascular events by 40% and risk of death from other causes by 17%, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology. First author Francis K.L. Chan discusses the group’s

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  • Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Do Nonselective Beta Blockers Increase Mortality in Patients With Cirrhosis and Ascites?

Nonselective beta blockers (NSBBs) do not significantly increase the risk of death in patients with cirrhosis and ascites or refractory ascites, researchers report in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the position that NSBBs be routinely withheld from patients with

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What Happens to Infants Whose Mothers Took Anti-TNF Agents During Pregnancy?

Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents can be detected in infants born to mothers with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) who took the drugs during pregnancy, researchers report in the July issue of Gastroenterology. Infliximab is cleared more slowly than adalimumab from infants. However, measureable levels in infants do not seem to be

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Peanut Consumption in Infancy not Only Prevents Allergy but Effects Persist After Avoidance

The benefits of regularly consuming peanut-containing foods early in life to prevent the development of peanut allergy persist even when subjects stopped peanut consumption for 1 year, a clinical study found. Early introduction of peanuts to infants at high risk for allergy was previously shown to prevent peanut allergy. In a

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Does IBD Increase Risk for Oral Cancer?

Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have an increased risk of oral cancers—especially tongue cancer—researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Women are at higher risk than men. Oral cancers develop in the mucosal surfaces of the lips, floor of mouth, tongue, buccal mucosa, lower and

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Should Patients with Crohn’s Disease Continue Receiving Immunomodulators When Starting Anti-TNF Therapy?

Continued use of immunomodulator therapy in patients with Crohn’s disease receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) therapy is no more effective than anti-TNF monotherapy in inducing or maintaining response or remission, researchers show. The meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials is published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. There is debate

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  • Do Patients Really Prefer Colon Capsule Endoscopy Over Colonoscopy?

Do Patients Really Prefer Colon Capsule Endoscopy Over Colonoscopy?

Slightly more than 50% of people with an inherited risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) agree to undergo screening for this cancer, and most prefer colonoscopy to colon capsule endoscopy—even though these are equally effective screening tools—researchers report in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Colonoscopy should therefore remain

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Deadly Bacteria Transmitted by Duodenoscopes

Duodenoscopes and endoscopes used in retrograde cholangiopancreatography are causing infections with carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and possibly other bacteria throughout the US. While medical societies and journals scramble to increase awareness of infection risks, medical centers are already taking precautions to avoid further infections. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA),

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  • Do Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Increase Risk for GI Bleeding?

Do Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Increase Risk for GI Bleeding?

Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increases risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) by 55%—and even more among patients also taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory or antiplatelet drugs, researchers report in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Risk might be reduced significantly by concomitant use of acid-suppressing drugs. Selective serotonin

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