• What are the Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

What are the Risk Factors for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

Persons with type 2 diabetes have a more than 2-fold increase in risk for severe liver disease, researchers report in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The authors found risk factors that might be used to identify persons with type 2 diabetes who should be screened for liver disease.

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  • Does DAA Therapy for HCV Infection Increase Survival in Patients Who Have Responded to Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

Does DAA Therapy for HCV Infection Increase Survival in Patients Who Have Responded to Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma?

In patients who have received successful treatment for HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), eradication of the HCV infection with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) significantly reduces risk of death, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common cause of HCC in North America and Europe. DAA

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  • What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

What Drugs Can Reduce Risk of Colorectal Cancer?

Use of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors (commonly used to treat erectile dysfunction) is associated with a 35% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among male patients with benign colorectal neoplasms, researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. The decreased risk of CRC was associated with an increased cumulative dose

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  • A Case of Spirochetosis That Resembles IBD

A Case of Spirochetosis That Resembles IBD

Researchers describe a patient with intestinal spirochetosis—a rare intestinal infection caused by Brachyspira aalborgi or Brachyspira pilosicoli that can involve the colon or terminal ileum and mimic inflammatory bowel diseases—in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Manasi Agrawal et al report the case of a 45-year-old man with HIV infection and an undetectable viral

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  • Has MELD-Na Improved Outcomes of Patients on the Liver Transplant Waitlist?

Has MELD-Na Improved Outcomes of Patients on the Liver Transplant Waitlist?

Liver allocation based on model for end-stage liver disease-sodium (MELD-Na) score improved waitlist outcomes and provided significant benefit to patients with hyponatremia, researchers report in the November issue of Gastroenterology. However, there are discrepancies in transplantation survival benefit, so current rules for liver allocation might require revision, the authors state. The

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  • Should We Screen for HCC?

Should We Screen for HCC?

Screening patients with cirrhosis for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by abdominal ultrasonography (USS) and/or measurement of serum level of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is not associated with reduced mortality from this cancer, reseachers report from a matched case–control study in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk (1%–8%

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  • How Does Cigarette Smoke Promote Pancreatic Tumor Development?

How Does Cigarette Smoke Promote Pancreatic Tumor Development?

Exposure to cigarette smoke activates stem cell features in pancreatic cells, via nicotinic cholinergic receptor signaling to transcription factors that activate expression of stem cell genes, researchers report in the September issue of Gastroenterology. Levels of the stem cell transcriptional regulator PAF1 are increased in pancreatic tumors from humans and

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  • Are Eating Competitions Dangerous?

Are Eating Competitions Dangerous?

The stomachs of competitive eaters accommodate large quantities of food by repeated rapid distension of the gastric wall during eating episodes. A Clinical Challenges and Images in GI article in the June issue of Gastroenterology presents an adverse outcome of these competitions. Tian-Zhi Lim et al describe the case of a 30-year-old, healthy man

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  • What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

What Happens When Patients With Crohn’s Disease in Remission Stop Taking Infliximab?

When patients with Crohn’s disease in sustained remission stopped taking infliximab for a median 7 years, almost one fifth did not require retreatment or have a major complication, researchers report in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Fewer than one fifth of patients required surgery or developed a complex perianal fistula. Increasing numbers of patients

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  • What is the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in Patients with Low-Risk IPMNs?

What is the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer in Patients with Low-Risk IPMNs?

Low-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms have an almost 8% chance of progressing to pancreatic cancer within 10 years, whereas higher-risk IPMNs have almost 25% chance, reports a systematic review and meta-analysis in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Continued long-term surveillance is therefore important for patients with low-risk, as

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