• What can we do with Gastrointestinal Organoids?

What can we do with Gastrointestinal Organoids?

Researchers review the latest discoveries from studies of tissue-derived and pluripotent stem cell–derived intestinal, gastric, esophageal, liver, and pancreatic organoids in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Studies of organoids have provided valuable information about GI development, tissue homeostasis, and disease and might be used to develop personalized medicines. In vitro organoid cultures are

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  • Can we Promote Liver Regeneration in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis?

Can we Promote Liver Regeneration in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis?

The combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and a long-acting form of erythropoietin increases survival of patients with decompensated cirrhosis, researchers report in the June issue of Gastroenterology. The growth factor combination also improved liver function and reduced risk for septic shock within 1 y of treatment. Decompensation in patients

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  • Review: LGR5 and Intestinal Stem Cells

Review: LGR5 and Intestinal Stem Cells

Since the discovery of LGR5 as a marker of intestinal stem cells, we have learned a great deal about the intestinal crypt stem cell niche. In the August issue of Gastroenterology Bon-Kyoung Koo and Hans Clevers review the discovery of crypt base columnar cells as LGR5+ adult stem cells and

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How do Intestinal Stem Cells get their Wnt?

Intestinal homeostasis and stem cells are not affected when Paneth cells stop producing Wnt, but Wnt is required to maintain the stem cell niche in intestinal epithelial cultures, according to a mouse study in the December issue of Gastroenterology. These findings indicate that underlying mesenchymal cells provide a secondary physiological

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Could Bone Marrow Cells Contribute to Stomach Cancer?

H pylori recruit bone marrow-derived cells to the gastric mucosa that contribute to tumor development, according to the February issue of Gastroenterology. H pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis through many mechanisms, such as causing inflammation and producing virulence factors that alter gastric cell activity. Over time, these lead to metaplasia, dysplasia,

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