• How to Get Rid of H pylori Infection—And do we Need to?

How to Get Rid of H pylori Infection—And do we Need to?

Helicobacter pylori infection increases risk of gastric cancer, by inducing inflammation and genetic instability in the gastric mucosa. However, it is not clear how best to clear the infection, or even whether H pylori can provide some health benefits. In a Review article in the April issue of Gastroenterology, David Y. Graham discusses the mechanisms H pylori–induced carcinogenesis and

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  • Author Q&A Series: H pylori-associated Gastric Cancer

Author Q&A Series: H pylori-associated Gastric Cancer

Gastric tumors and tissues from humans and mice accumulate somatic mutations in various genes in the gastric mucosa upon Helicobacter pylori infection, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology. In the study, Takahiro Shimizu et al. show that increased cytidine deaminase activity in these tissues promotes the accumulation of these mutations and might

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Researchers Characterize 4 Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer

Stomach cancers fall into 4 distinct molecular subtypes, researchers report. This information could lead to new strategies to treat patients with specific types of gastric cancer. In the study, published online July 23, 2014, in Nature, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas Network (TCGA) report findings that could change how

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  • Does Getting Rid of H pylori Stop Gastric Cancer’s Return?

Does Getting Rid of H pylori Stop Gastric Cancer’s Return?

Eradication of Helicobacter pylori after endoscopic resection of gastric lesions doesn’t prevent later development of new stomach tumors, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. H pylori infection can lead to gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia or cancer—specifically non-cardia gastric cancer. It does so by inducing inflammation

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Can We Increase Survival of Patients with Gastric Cancer?

Researchers have identified factors that affect life expectancy of patients with stomach cancer, reported in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Use of these factors to increase early detection of gastric adenocarcinoma could greatly increase survival times among patients. Gastric cancer is a significant cause of mortality and

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  • Overall Diet, Rather than Specific Foods, Affect Risk for Esophageal Cancer

Overall Diet, Rather than Specific Foods, Affect Risk for Esophageal Cancer

A Mediterranean diet and overall healthy eating, rather than a particular group of foods or nutrients, reduce the risk for esophageal cancers—particularly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), according to the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Although diet has been associated with cancers of the esophagus and stomach, few prospective

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Why Do Only Some Gastric Tumors Respond to Therapy?

Tumors from patients with gastric cancer can be divided into subgroups, based on their gene expression pattern. This information can be used to select the best treatment, according to Patrick Tan and colleagues in the August issue of Gastroenterology. Gastric tumors have large, inter-individual differences in aggressiveness, histopathology features, and

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H Pylori—Are They Gone Yet?

Helicobacter pylori infection can be treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and antibiotics, but physicians need ways to determine if the bacteria are completely eradicated months later. In the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Luigi Gatta et al. describe a simple blood test that can detect H pylori

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Origins of Gastric Cancer

Gastric tumors can arise from a single mutation in a single stomach gland, according to Lydia Gutierrez-Gonzalez et al. in the April issue of Gastroenterology. To study how gastric dysplasias form and expand, Gutierrez-Gonzalez et al. analyzed 23 samples of gastric epithelium from patients who received surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma

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