• What can we do with Gastrointestinal Organoids?

What can we do with Gastrointestinal Organoids?

Researchers review the latest discoveries from studies of tissue-derived and pluripotent stem cell–derived intestinal, gastric, esophageal, liver, and pancreatic organoids in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Studies of organoids have provided valuable information about GI development, tissue homeostasis, and disease and might be used to develop personalized medicines. In vitro organoid cultures are

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  • Special Issue: Food, the Immune System, and the GI Tract

Special Issue: Food, the Immune System, and the GI Tract

The digestion of food and absorption of nutrients is the principal role of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract—everyone wants to know what we should eat and how it affects our body. Interactions between food and the immune system affect our microbiome, development of food allergies, nutrition, risk for inflammatory disorders or cancer, and even

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Video: Does Stress Cause Ulcers?

Psychological stress increases the risk for peptic ulcers, partly by affecting health risk behaviors, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Although peptic ulcers are considered to be caused by stress, Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) took over as the accepted causes. However, less than a third of peptic ulcers develop in people

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  • Does Controlling Glycemia Increase Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes?

Does Controlling Glycemia Increase Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes?

Two-thirds of patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes have mostly asymptomatic yet abnormal gastric emptying, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, sustained improvements in glycemic control do not affect gastric emptying, the researchers found in a prospective study. Diabetes is associated with delayed

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In Vitro Stomach?

Researchers have developed an advanced, long-term, 3-dimensional organoid culture system for primary, untransformed human gastric epithelium. The system, described in the January issue of Gastroenterology, provides evidence for the presence of stem cells in adult human gastric tissue and can be used to study changes that occur in the gastric epithelium during

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  • Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Combined use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nNSAIDs), COX-2 selective inhibitors, or low-dose aspirin with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors significantly increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. In their case series analysis of data from 114,835 patients with upper GI bleeding (930,888 person-years of follow-up),

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Video: Gastric to Esophageal Mucosal Transplantation

In the April issue of Gastroenterology, researchers report transplantation of mucosa from a patient’s stomach to esophagus, to prevent stricture formation after circumferential endoscopic mucosal dissection of early-stage esophageal cancer. Endoscopic submucosal resection and dissection are used to remove areas of dysplasia and cancer from the esophagus. However, stricture formation is a major drawback

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What to do About Gastric Polyps

When clinicians detect a gastric polyp during endoscopy, they are faced with many questions: does the polyp need to be excised, or can a biopsy sample be collected and analyzed? Which polyps should be biopsied? Should patients then be followed, and how? In the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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Are Patients Who Take Continuous NSAIDs Receiving Gastroprotection?

Among patients who continuously take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a third of co-prescriptions for drugs to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) damage are not renewed within the next 2 years. This discontinuation increases patients’ risk of stomach pain, inflammation, or ulcers, according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients

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Are There Stem Cells in the Esophagus and Stomach?

Researchers have identified potential stem cells in human esophagus and stomach, as well as those in metaplastic esophagus that could lead to esophageal cancer, according to the April issue of Gastroenterology. Stem cells have been reported to exist in the basal layer of the human esophagus—their progeny are believed to

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