In Vitro Stomach?

Researchers have developed an advanced, long-term, 3-dimensional organoid culture system for primary, untransformed human gastric epithelium. The system, described in the January issue of Gastroenterology, provides evidence for the presence of stem cells in adult human gastric tissue and can be used to study changes that occur in the gastric epithelium during

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  • Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Combined use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nNSAIDs), COX-2 selective inhibitors, or low-dose aspirin with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors significantly increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. In their case series analysis of data from 114,835 patients with upper GI bleeding (930,888 person-years of follow-up),

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Video: Gastric to Esophageal Mucosal Transplantation

In the April issue of Gastroenterology, researchers report transplantation of mucosa from a patient’s stomach to esophagus, to prevent stricture formation after circumferential endoscopic mucosal dissection of early-stage esophageal cancer. Endoscopic submucosal resection and dissection are used to remove areas of dysplasia and cancer from the esophagus. However, stricture formation is a major drawback

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What to do About Gastric Polyps

When clinicians detect a gastric polyp during endoscopy, they are faced with many questions: does the polyp need to be excised, or can a biopsy sample be collected and analyzed? Which polyps should be biopsied? Should patients then be followed, and how? In the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and

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Are Patients Who Take Continuous NSAIDs Receiving Gastroprotection?

Among patients who continuously take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a third of co-prescriptions for drugs to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) damage are not renewed within the next 2 years. This discontinuation increases patients’ risk of stomach pain, inflammation, or ulcers, according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients

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Are There Stem Cells in the Esophagus and Stomach?

Researchers have identified potential stem cells in human esophagus and stomach, as well as those in metaplastic esophagus that could lead to esophageal cancer, according to the April issue of Gastroenterology. Stem cells have been reported to exist in the basal layer of the human esophagus—their progeny are believed to

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Molecular Mechanisms of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

Many of the beneficial effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), including improved glucose homeostasis, require the actions of melanocortin-4 receptors (MC4Rs) on autonomic neurons, according to the March issue of Gastroenterology. Fasting glycemia often improves within days of RYGB (see below figure), which produces greater improvements in glucose homeostasis than

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Does a Response to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Indicate GERD?

Just because a patient’s upper gastrointestinal symptoms are alleviated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) doesn’t necessarily mean that they have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The efficacy of PPI therapy often is tested to determine whether patients’ symptoms are acid-related and

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How Dangerous Are H pylori-Negative Idiopathic Bleeding Ulcers?

Patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer not caused by Helicobacter pylori infection or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are at considerable risk of recurrent bleeding and death. Furthermore, acid-suppressive drugs do not protect these patients, according to the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Peptic ulcers that are not associated

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Treating Rumination and Supragastric Belching

Baclofen is an effective treatment for patients with rumination or supragastric belching/aerophagia, according to the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Rumination syndrome is characterized by the effortless, often repetitive regurgitation of recently ingested food into the mouth; it results from contraction of the abdominal muscles and a subsequent

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