Why Do Only Some Gastric Tumors Respond to Therapy?

Tumors from patients with gastric cancer can be divided into subgroups, based on their gene expression pattern. This information can be used to select the best treatment, according to Patrick Tan and colleagues in the August issue of Gastroenterology. Gastric tumors have large, inter-individual differences in aggressiveness, histopathology features, and

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Fluid Resuscitation for Acute Pancreatitis—When and With What?

Patients that are given fluid resuscitation within 24 hours of developing acute pancreatitis are less likely to experience systemic inflammatory response (SIR) or organ failure, according to a study by Matthew G. Warndorf et al. in the August issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process

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Constipation Relief

The drug bisacodyl is effective against chronic constipation and improves patients’ quality of life, according to a large study published by Michael Kamm et al. in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Constipation affects 12% to 19% of Americans; its prevalence increases with age and it affects women

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Does Mucosal Healing Determine Which Patients Will Recover From Ulcerative Colitis?

Lack of mucosal healing, based on endoscopic analysis, identifies patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who are not likely to respond to corticosteroid therapy, according to Sandro Ardizzone et al. in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. In a prospective study, Ardizzone et al. followed 157 patients with moderate

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Coffee Therapy for Hepatitis C?

Drinking 3 cups of coffee a day helps patients with hepatitis C respond to treatment, report Neal Freedman et al. in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Coffee reduces risks of progression of liver diseases and risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, so Freedman et al. investigated whether it also had benefits for patients

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Tracking Crohn’s Therapy

Measuring blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, is a good way to monitor recovery from Crohn’s disease (CD) in patients being treated with infliximab, according to Matthias Jürgens et al. in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. CRP is a protein released into the blood

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New Word on GERD?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are useful for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although heartburn completely resolves in only 40% of patients that take these drugs. Furthermore, long-term use of PPIs can increase risk for pneumonia, Clostridium difficile infection, and bone disorders, so other therapeutic strategies are needed. In the August

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Curbing Crohn’s for the Long Term?

Most people with Crohn’s disease receive surgery, yet the disease comes back a short time later. A study in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology reports that giving patients low doses of infliximab immediately after surgery prevents disease recurrence over long time periods. Dario Sorrentino et al. began

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