Long-Term Effects of Teduglutide for Short-Bowel Syndrome

The glucagon-like peptide (GLP) teduglutide is effective for long-term treatment of patients with short-bowel syndrome intestinal failure, according to the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Short-bowel syndrome is a relatively rare condition that results from massive small bowel resection or bypass. Patients used to die from nutrient malabsorption

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Is SVR12 As Good As SVR24?

In patients with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, a sustained viral response to treatment regimens 12 weeks after therapy (SVR12) is a good indicator that the response will be maintained until week 24 (SVR 24), based on an analysis of pooled clinical trial data published in the June issue of

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How Can We Screen for Pancreatic Cancer and its Precursors?

Individuals with invasive pancreatic cancer or high-grade dysplasia can be identified based on a specific DNA mutation in pancreatic juice samples from the duodena, according to the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Tests for mutant TP53 might be developed to improve the diagnosis of and screening for pancreatic cancer and its precursors.

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How Often Do Medications Cause Liver Injury?

Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) could be more common than previously believed, according to a population-based study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology. Amoxicillin-clavulanate seems to be the most common cause, and azathioprine appears to be the most hepatotoxic. Many medications, such chlorpromazine, azathioprine, and sulfasalazine, can cause liver injury,

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Should Everybody Be Tested for Celiac Disease?

Not only does celiac disease cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloating—untreated disease leads to progressive bone loss and derangements, increasing the risk for early osteoporosis and fractures of the hip and vertebrae. The June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology reports that current screening strategies to identify people with celiac

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A Special Issue: the Exocrine Pancreas and its Disorders

Everything you ever wanted to know about the pancreas, its development and function, and the pathogenesis and treatment of its disorders are now covered in a special issue of Gastroenterology. Pancreatology is a rapidly developing field—recent findings from molecular and genetic studies are being developed into new treatment strategies. To update

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How Does PSC Lead to IBD?

Many patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) also have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which becomes more severe after liver transplantation, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. These patients might require special immunosuppressive regimens. PSC is a chronic, cholestatic liver disease that eventually leads to cirrhosis

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Fishing for Genes that Cause Biliary Atresia

A study of zebrafish has helped identify a susceptibility gene for biliary atresia, as reported in the May issue of Gastroenterology. Biliary atresia is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disorder of infants that involves the extrahepatic and intrahepatic biliary tree and causes obliteration of the ducts, leading to cholestasis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis.

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Are Patients Who Take Continuous NSAIDs Receiving Gastroprotection?

Among patients who continuously take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a third of co-prescriptions for drugs to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) damage are not renewed within the next 2 years. This discontinuation increases patients’ risk of stomach pain, inflammation, or ulcers, according to the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Patients

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Are There Stem Cells in the Esophagus and Stomach?

Researchers have identified potential stem cells in human esophagus and stomach, as well as those in metaplastic esophagus that could lead to esophageal cancer, according to the April issue of Gastroenterology. Stem cells have been reported to exist in the basal layer of the human esophagus—their progeny are believed to

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