Does a Response to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Indicate GERD?

Just because a patient’s upper gastrointestinal symptoms are alleviated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) doesn’t necessarily mean that they have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The efficacy of PPI therapy often is tested to determine whether patients’ symptoms are acid-related and

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Many Patients Without GERD Continue to Take PPIs

More than 42% of patients with negative results from pH monitoring studies continue proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, despite evidence that they do not have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. PPI therapy is effective for about 75% of patients with GERD

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Reflux and Laryngitis—a Complicated Relationship

Results from a large clinical trial show that proton pump inhibitors relieve some, but not all the symptoms of chronic laryngitis. One type of laryngitis, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), is characterized by hoarseness, chronic cough, frequent throat clearing, and the feeling of something in the throat. Because it is believed to

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