• Which Patients with Early-stage Ulcerative Colitis Have the Worst Prognoses?

Which Patients with Early-stage Ulcerative Colitis Have the Worst Prognoses?

It is a challenge to accurately identify patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis (UC) who are at highest risk for a poor outcome and therefore might require salvage therapy. In a Perspective article in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Walter Reinisch et al present prognostic factors for adults with newly

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  • Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

Are People of Indian Origin at Higher Risk for IBD?

People of Indian origin living in the United States have a greater than average risk for all types of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) than other American populations, researchers report in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. East Asians and Hispanics have a lower risk, similar to that of the populations still

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  • Chronic use of Narcotics Among Children with IBD

Chronic use of Narcotics Among Children with IBD

Chronic use of narcotics is common among children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)—particularly among those with anxiety and depression, researchers report in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Identifying and treating psychological disorders could reduce symptoms that lead to narcotic use and their complications in these patients. Narcotics are prescribed

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  • Video: Which Patients with Crohn’s Disease Need a CT Scan?

Video: Which Patients with Crohn’s Disease Need a CT Scan?

Researchers have developed a system to identify patients with Crohn’s disease who do not require computed tomography (CT) evaluation, described by Shail M. Govani et al  in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The system uses laboratory test results to avoid CT analysis, and thereby unnecessary exposure to radiation and increased cancer risk. People who come to the emergency department with

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In Treating Crohn’s Disease, Earlier is Better

Patients receiving medical therapies when they have more complicated stages of Crohn’s disease (CD) are more likely to require surgery, researchers report in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. The disease is most-effectively treated by drugs at its early, inflammatory stages. Patients have a 40%–71% risk for requiring

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Are Mitochondria Involved in Ulcerative Colitis?

Changes in mitochondrial DNA that increase levels of ATP in the intestinal mucosa protect mice from colitis, according to the November issue of Gastroenterology. Strategies to increase mitochondrial ATP production by intestinal epithelial cells might therefore be developed to treat patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Characteristics of UC include reduced levels

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Does Thiopurine Therapy Increase Cancer Risk?

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) have a 4-fold increase in risk of lymphoma during treatment with thiopurines, compared to UC patients who have not been treated with these drugs, according to a nationwide cohort study in the November issue of Gastroenterology. The risk increases gradually with successive years of therapy,

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  • Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Eight weeks of therapy with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-rich cannabis reduced symptoms in patients with active Crohn’s disease, according to a controlled trial published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, these effects were only temporary. The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries to treat a

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Are All Patients With IBD at Increased Risk for Colorectal Cancer?

Although inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increases risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), the risk is only substantial among patients with long-term, extensive colitis. Furthermore, CRC risk is reduced by thiopurine therapy, according to the July issue of Gastroenterology. Laurent Beaugerie et al. collected data from 19,486 patients with IBD (60% with

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What are the Effects of IBD Therapy During Pregnancy?

In pregnant women treated for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD),  infliximab and adalimumab, but not certolizumab, cross the placenta and are detected in infants up to 6 months after birth, according to the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology (CGH). However, they do not appear to cause birth defects, and women

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