• How Many Patients are Screened for HBV Infection Before Chemotherapy?

How Many Patients are Screened for HBV Infection Before Chemotherapy?

Only a small percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy are screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, although the proportion of patients screened has increased slightly over the past decade, researchers report in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Strategies are needed to ensure that patients receiving chemotherapy are

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Video Abstract: Increased Risk of Cervical Cancer in Women with IBD

Women with ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease are at increased risk for cervical neoplasias, researchers report in the April issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Christine Rungoe et al performed a population-based cohort study of 27,408 women with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). In her video abstract, she says “we observed that women with ulcerative

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  • What to do About Sessile Serrated Adenomas

What to do About Sessile Serrated Adenomas

Sessile serrated adenomas (SSAs), characterized by the saw-toothed appearance of the colonic crypts, form and progress to colorectal cancers (CRCs) via a different pathway than conventional adenomas and are thought to contribute to 20% to 35% of all cases of CRC. Although little is known about their pathogenesis, endoscopists must be aware of the unique features of SSAs to efficiently detect

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  • Using High-resolution Microendoscopy to Detect Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

Using High-resolution Microendoscopy to Detect Gastrointestinal Neoplasia

The high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) allows for real-time imaging of the esophageal and gastric epithelium with subcellular resolution. In an Advances in Translational Science article in the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Justin S. Louie et al discuss the performance of this portable, low cost, optical biopsy technology in screening and surveillance of gastrointestinal

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Video: New Tool Aids Determination of Colonoscopy Surveillance Intervals

With an increased emphasis on improving quality and decreasing costs, new tools are needed to improve adherence to evidence-based practices and guidelines in endoscopy. In a video abstract, Timothy D. Imler describes an automated system that uses natural language processing (NLP) and clinical decision support to facilitate determination of colonoscopy surveillance

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Should Everybody Be Tested for Celiac Disease?

Not only does celiac disease cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloating—untreated disease leads to progressive bone loss and derangements, increasing the risk for early osteoporosis and fractures of the hip and vertebrae. The June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology reports that current screening strategies to identify people with celiac

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Why Do People Still Develop Colorectal Cancer After Colonoscopy?

Some people who receive screening colonoscopies are still at risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) because neoplastic polyps found are not completely removed, according to the January issue of Gastroenterology. While the quality of colonoscopy examinations has focused on polyp detection, better methods are needed to evaluate polyp removal. The goal

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Can Imaging Identify the Most Dangerous Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms?

Endoscopic ultrasound can be used to identify cystic neoplasms of the pancreas that are most likely to become malignant, according to the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Mucus-producing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), that have mural nodules

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Does Celiac Disease Increase the Risk of GI Cancer?

People with celiac disease do not have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, according to a large population-based study from Peter Elfström et al. in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Celiac disease has been associated with GI cancers in small studies, but there have been

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In CRC Screening, Location Matters

Colonoscopy screening reduces mortality from cancers of the distal, but not proximal, colon, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology. Harminder Singh et al. studied mortality from CRC among more than 55,000 people that had received screening colonoscopies, compared with the general population. They found that

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