• Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Video: Risk of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding From Different Drug Combinations

Combined use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nNSAIDs), COX-2 selective inhibitors, or low-dose aspirin with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors significantly increases the risk of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, researchers report in the October issue of Gastroenterology. In their case series analysis of data from 114,835 patients with upper GI bleeding (930,888 person-years of follow-up),

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Podcast: Efficacy of Vedolizumab in Patients with Moderately to Severely Active Crohn’s disease

Listen to Bruce Sands discuss his article in the September issue of Gastroenterology discussing results from placebo-controlled, phase 3 double-blind trial of the efficacy of vedolizumab  in patients with moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease, including those for whom previous anti-TNF treatment had failed. Sands et al. report that vedolizumab, an antibody against the integrin α4β7, is no more effective

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  • How Do NS5A Inhibitors Prevent HCV Replication?

How Do NS5A Inhibitors Prevent HCV Replication?

Researchers have uncovered the mechanisms of drugs that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 5A (NS5A), described in the August issue of Gastroenterology. In a quantitative analysis of the kinetics of NS5A inhibitors, David R. McGivern et al.  show that these agents rapidly inhibit intracellular assembly of virions and

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  • Does Cancer Treatment Bring Back HCV Infection?

Does Cancer Treatment Bring Back HCV Infection?

Treated hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections do not return after patients receive chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy, researchers report in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Cancer chemotherapy leads to HCV reactivation in patients with chronic infections, but little is known about the effect of chemotherapy on HCV infections

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  • What is the Best Way to Care for Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

What is the Best Way to Care for Patients with Alcoholic Hepatitis?

Although alcohol-related liver disease is the 8th most common cause of mortality in the US and the 2nd leading cause of mortality among all gastrointestinal diseases, there are few therapeutic options for patients or resources to support identification of new therapies. However, treatment approaches are being developed; a review in

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Are IBD Drugs Safe During Pregnancy?

Researchers find no evidence that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) during pregnancy, or medical treatment for IBD during pregnancy, increases risk for congenital abnormalities in children. The findings, based on a large database analysis, are published in the January issue of Gastroenterology. IBD frequently affects women of reproductive age, and is often

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Putting a Cap on Acid Reflux

Researchers show that a polysaccharide ‘raft’ can float on top of acid in the stomach to block its backflow into the esophagus. It reduces reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to a clinical trial the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. GERD is a common condition

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What is the Best Treatment for Esophageal Adenocarcioma?

Patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) who receive endoscopic therapy survive as long as patients treated by surgery, according to the November issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Esophageal cancer is a highly fatal malignancy—approximate 19% of patients survive 5 years. The incidence of EAC, the most common form of esophageal

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  • Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Cannabis for Crohn’s Disease?

Eight weeks of therapy with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-rich cannabis reduced symptoms in patients with active Crohn’s disease, according to a controlled trial published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. However, these effects were only temporary. The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries to treat a

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A New Drug for Diabetes and Fatty Liver Disease?

Obeticholic acid (OCA)—an agonist of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR)— increases insulin sensitivity and reduces markers of liver inflammation and fibrosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study published in the September issue of Gastroenterology. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and

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